Day Two Hundred Twenty Eight

Day Two Hundred Twenty Eight

A few nice id theft images I found:

Day Two Hundred Twenty Eight
id theft
Image by Dustin Diaz
228/365. This is my business tielet’s talk

More than a few things….

As most of you know from earlier, a photo of mine was recently mis-used as it appeared in a full-spread two-page featured article in Voyeur Magazine, a Text Pacific publication for Virgin Blue…. okay.

Now it’s time to talk a little business, and clear out some details. Trash talking and name-calling may perhaps be a little out of line. But let’s just clear up a few things before the blame is put on Virgin, Getty, or Text Pacific Publishing.

Text Pacific Publishing has noted that they credit each photograph in the opening spread (as per an anonymous Flickr account comment) and "royalty-free images from Getty are credited as ‘Getty Images’"

This, technically, was done. The only things in question that remain are…

1) The credits remain questionable. If Text Pacfic goes out of their way to credit photographers (Ebony Harrison & Robert Zappulla), why not credit the others, since afterall, it’s quite clear who took the photo when purchasing?

But ok. That’s fine, actually. T.P. is not under obligation to offer a proper credit. I would however, nonetheless, change the way they do credits since it does in fact appear that someone else is getting credit (just a minor UI change)

Which brings to a second point.

2) Getty. Where is their role? If the photo was in fact purchased, when do I see proceeds? Afterall, it’s a little weird that there would be any time-lapse between someone purchasing a photo, and me just "finding it on the internet". Even my bank will post transactions within the hour.

3) To answer a few responses from this awesome Flickr army.

a) "You shouldn’t be posting high resolution photos to the web"

I am a firm believer that this is not how things are fixed. To take this further, I will continue to keep my photos "un-watermarked". The occasional text that appears on my photos is for "art sake", not as a theft-preventative measure.

And lastly on this matter, my photos are meant to be viewed large. They have detail — detail that shouldn’t be bound to a 500 x 500 pixel box.

b) "Did you really buy that tie today?"

Yep.

————————

And of course, the real reason this all started….

strobist info: SB-900 @ 1/8 @ 17mm into 43" umbrella high camera left.

camera info: Nikon D3 | 85mm(ƒ/1.4D) | ƒ/4.0 | ISO 100 | 1/200s — Tripoded via Pocket Wizard II’s

UPDATE: For anyone interested in the outcome, status updates will be posted on the original thread and will be notified by, of course, the twitter

James Lowrie
id theft
Image by Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums
This mug shot comes from a police identification book believed to be from the 1930s. It was originally found in a junk shop by a member of the public and subsequently donated to Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums. No information is available to confirm which police force compiled it but evidence suggests it’s from the Newcastle upon Tyne area.

This image is part of the Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums set Newcastle upon Tyne criminals of the 1930’s.

Accession no. DX1190

(Copyright) We’re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite ‘Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums’ when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you’re unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Peter Quinn
id theft
Image by Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums
This mug shot comes from a police identification book believed to be
from the 1930s. It was originally found in a junk shop by a member of
the public and subsequently donated to Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums.
No information is available to confirm which police force compiled it
but evidence suggests it’s from the Newcastle upon Tyne area.

This image is part of the Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums set Newcastle upon Tyne criminals of the 1930’s.

Accession no. DX1190

(Copyright) We’re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite ‘Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums’ when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you’re unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

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