Nice Credit Rating photos

Nice Credit Rating photos

Some cool credit rating images:

Eta Carinae: Our Neighboring Superstars (NASA, Chandra, 08/26/14)
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Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
Editor’s note: Happy Friday, Flickr friends! This image is related to this week’s Chandra release for the Eta Carinae star system. Hope you enjoy!

Eta Carinae is one of the most luminous known star systems in our galaxy. It radiates energy at a rate that is 5 million times that of the Sun. Most of this energy is radiated at infrared wavelengths. It is shrouded in a rapidly expanding cloud of dust which absorbs radiation from the central star and re-radiates it in the infrared.

Read more:
chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2014/etacar/more.html

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Read more about Chandra:
www.nasa.gov/chandra

Chandra album on Flickr:
www.flickr.com/photos/nasamarshall/sets/72157606205297786/

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These official NASA photographs are being made available for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photographs. The photographs may not be used in materials, advertisements, products, or promotions that in any way suggest approval or endorsement by NASA. All Images used must be credited. For information on usage rights please visit: www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelin…

Supernova Remnant is a Textbook Case (NASA, Chandra, 1/30/07)
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Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
Editor’s Note: This image from 2007 shows Chandra X-ray & VLA Radio Images of G11.2-0.3.

G11.2-0.3 is a circularly symmetric supernova remnant that contains a dense, rotating dead star at its center, representing a textbook case of what the remnant of an exploding star should look like after a couple thousand years. When a massive star collapses, the outer layers of the star are blown away in an extremely energetic explosion. Depending on the mass of the original star, a dense object such as a neutron star or a black hole, can form and be left behind at the explosion’s center. Such a neutron star, known as a "pulsar" when it rapidly rotates, can be kicked by the thermonuclear shock wave created when the star exploded, causing it to race through space at millions of miles per hour.

By combining X-ray and radio observations, astronomers have evidence that G11.2-0.3 is likely the result of the explosive death of such a massive star, perhaps witnessed in 386 A.D. Radio observations measure the remnant’s expansion rate, which, in turn, can be used to calculate how long ago the star exploded. The radio data is consistent with association of the supernova remnant with the "guest star" reported by Chinese astronomers nearly 2,000 years ago. Chandra’s ability to pinpoint the pulsar at nearly the very center of G11.2-0.3 also supports the idea that this debris field could have been created around the time of the Chinese observations. Surprisingly, the age of the pulsar determined from the X-ray and radio data differs from the standard pulsar age estimate, usually determined from how fast it is spinning. In this case, the so-called spin parameters suggest the G11.2-0.3 is 10 times older than the remnant age. This argues strongly that young pulsar spin ages can be very misleading and should be considered with caution.

Read entire caption/view more images: www.chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2007/g11/

Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Eureka Scientific/M.Roberts et al.; Radio: NRAO/AUI/NSF

Caption credit: Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

Read more about Chandra:
www.nasa.gov/chandra

p.s. You can see all of our Chandra photos in the Chandra Group in Flickr at: www.flickr.com/groups/chandranasa/ We’d love to have you as a member!

You can also get Twitter updates whenever there’s a new image:
www.twitter.com/nasa1fan

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