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NEW….ONLINE CREDIT APPLICATION

NEW….ONLINE CREDIT APPLICATION

John Carter GE Capital Navistar Financial and Juan Vasquez Finance management Westrux Global discuss the roll out associated with brand-new GE Capital system for Westrux Overseas.

Exposing On Line Credit Application.

http://www.westrux.com/credit_app.php

Why was my credit card application denied?

Why was my credit card application denied?

It helps to know how credit card companies decide whether to approve potential customers.

“They’re going to take a look at how you’ve handled credit in the past. How you’ve made your monthly payments. How much debt have you gotten yourself into and how much new credit have you applied for,” says Justine Orantes, a credit counselor at ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions.

They’re also taking a look at what your income may be. With that in mind, let’s say you do get denied. What went wrong?

There are a few things it could be. Maybe you simply made a mistake on the application. Maybe your credit report has an error. It could be that you’re recently unemployed, or your income is too low. Of course, a bad credit history will also affect your approval.

And even if your credit history looks good, if you’re applying for a lot of credit all at once, a bank may suspect you’re having financial problems.

If you are denied credit, what should you do? Step one: Check your credit report for errors. You can get one free copy of your credit report per year from each of the three major credit bureaus by going to annualcreditreport.com.

“It’s recommended that you review your credit report on at least an annual basis to make sure that everything is correct on your credit report,” says Orantes.

If an error isn’t to blame, you probably need to work on your credit. “Take a look at your credit report,” says Orantes. “If there’s a delinquency, what was that delinquency? How long ago was it?
Has it been resolved? If it hasn’t been resolved then go ahead and take a look at how to go about resolving it.”

Are you missing payment due dates now? “If you’re having difficulties, it’s always recommend you reach out to your lender or your creditor and have them explore options with you so that you are current,” says Orantes.

You may need to reevaluate your credit usage. A good rule of thumb is to keep your credit card balances below one-third of your total available credit. That’s the sum of all your credit limits.

If you were denied over an income issue, you might have to wait to apply for credit until you find employment, or your income increases.

When you’re ready to apply for a card again, do your homework. Give the issuer a call. Ask what their approval guidelines are for that particular card. Do they have a minimum income requirement? What credit score are they looking for?

Finally, take care when filling out the application. “Always make sure you print clearly on the applications,” says Orantes. “Have the banker or whoever gave you the application review it and make sure you filled in everything and you’re not missing any information.”

With a little research, and maybe some credit repair, you’ll do well to be approved the next time around. Kristin Wong, CreditCards.com.
Video Rating: / 5

Seaton Carew Lifeboat and Crew

Seaton Carew Lifeboat and Crew

Have a look at these credit application pictures:

Seaton Carew Lifeboat and Crew
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Image by Museum of Hartlepool
This is certainly an image associated with the lifeboat and staff of Seaton Carew.

Photograph Range No : 2517

Images from Hartlepool Cultural providers that are the main Commons on Flickr tend to be labeled ‘no recognized copyright laws restrictions’ showing that Hartlepool Cultural providers is unacquainted with any current copyright laws constraints on these images either since the copyright laws is waived or the term of copyright has expired.

Commercial utilization of images is not permitted. Applications for commercial usage and for high quality reproductions must certanly be made to Hartlepool Cultural providers, Sir William Gray House, Clarence path, Hartlepool, TS24 8BT. When using the photos please credit ‘Hartlepool Cultural providers’.

Wadi As-Sirhan Basin, Saudi Arabia (NASA, Global Space Station, 02/21/12)
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Image by NASA’s Marshall Area Flight Center
Agricultural industries when you look at the Wadi As-Sirhan Basin in Saudi Arabia are featured inside picture photographed by an Expedition 30 team member from the International Space Station. Northern Saudi Arabia hosts probably the most substantial sand and gravel deserts in the world, but modern-day agricultural technology changed the facial skin of a few of them. This photo provides the nearly unique image of plentiful green areas in the midst of a barren desert — specifically the Wadi As-Sirhan Basin of northwestern Saudi Arabia. As recently as 1986 there clearly was little to no agricultural activity in the area, but across subsequent 26 many years farming fields have now been steadily developed, largely as a result of investment of oil industry incomes because of the Saudi federal government. The areas make use of liquid pumped from subsurface aquifers and is distributed in rotation about a center point within a circular industry — a method referred to as center-pivot agriculture. This system affords certain benefits relative to more conventional surface irrigation such as for instance much better control over water use and application of fertilizers. Employing this alleged "precision agriculture" is especially important in areas subject to large evaporative water loss; by much better controlling the quantity and time of water application, evaporative losings could be minimized. Plants cultivated in the area consist of fresh fruits, veggies, and grain. For a feeling of scale, agricultural industries in active use (dark green) and fallow (brown to tan), tend to be more or less one kilometer in diameter. While a lot of the Wadi As-Sirhan Basin shown listed here is sandy (light tan to brown surfaces) and relatively level, low hills and rugged outcrops (dark-gray) of underlying sedimentary rocks tend to be noticeable at remaining and right.

Image credit: NASA

Initial picture:
spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/station/crew-30/html/…

More about universe study:
www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/index.html

There is a Flickr group about Space Station Research. Please feel welcome to join! www.flickr.com/groups/stationscience/

View above 400 pictures like this into the "NASA Earth Images" Flickr photoset:
www.flickr.com/photos/28634332@N05/

_____________________________________________
These formal NASA pictures are increasingly being provided for publication by news organizations and/or private usage printing by the subject(s) regarding the photographs. The pictures may not be found in materials, advertisements, products, or offers that by any means advise endorsement or recommendation by NASA. All photos used must certanly be credited. For info on use liberties be sure to visit: www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelin…

Flower in High Desert
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Image by cobalt123
NEW INFORMATION: THIS PICTURE BEGINS
FLICKR TOUR 20: Damages and Renewals

This slideshow was created making use of an innovative new web application by member "fd". You can find detials because of this user-friendly application at:
flagrantdisregard.com/flickr/slideshow.php

Connect with this tv show is:
flagrantdisregard.com/flickr/slideshow.php?id=70

All the photos are extracted from two units within my picture flow: Wupatki Ruins and Wukoki Ruins, near Sunset Crater in northern Arizona.

Since we come across just how easy this is certainly to generate "Flickr Tours", i am hoping more people will put together trips made from a along with other people’s photographs which are connected AND credited inside awesome brand new tool! thanks fd!
– – – –
Anybody determine this plant? This is taken with might work digital camera, a Kodak EasyShare 3.2 MP, and a shock in my experience how good it performed in the rapidly-advancing sunset into the wilderness. The colors are while they were in my opinion, even!

DGJ_3800 – Cox Warehouse

DGJ_3800 – Cox Warehouse

A few nice credit application images I found:

DGJ_3800 – Cox Warehouse
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Image by archer10 (Dennis) 92M Views
PLEASE, no multi invitations, glitters or self promotion in your comments. My photos are FREE for anyone to use, just give me credit and it would be nice if you let me know, thanks – NONE OF MY PICTURES ARE HDR.

The Cox Warehouse from the 1800s. The steeple was added for the movie “A Scarlet Letter”. Shelburne, Nova Scotia, Canada. This is one of the largest wooden buildings in the Canadian maritime provinces, was built for the Cox family in 1902. The Town of Shelburne has numerous 18th century buildings and has been the location for a number of movies, including the Scarlet Letter.

One of the Town of Shelburne’s most recognizable landmarks along the historic waterfront could someday be considered for demolition.

While no major decisions have been made at this time for the future of the Cox Warehouse, the Shelburne Historical Society has submitted an application to demolish or have substantial alterations done to the building. The Shelburne Historic Society does not have the capacity or capability of looking after the huge, 16,000 square foot structure and as it further deteriorates it becomes less safe.

Proud Farmer in Her Maize Field
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Image by USAID_IMAGES
Lead farmer, Cecilia Ndlovu of Tshongokwe irrigation scheme in Matabeleland province stands in front of her maize demonstration plot. Cecilia attributes her healthy crop to the good agricultural practices she learned through Zimbabwe Agricultural Income and Employment Development program trainings including proper use of herbicide technology, plant spacing, correct fertilizer application rates, and pest control.

Credit: Fintrac Inc. / Zimbabwe Agricultural Income & Employment Development Program (Zim-AIED)

decisions decisions, 2007
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Image by torbakhopper
so i tried my best to watch "an inconvenient truth" last night.

but i kept getting LOST in the blizzard of mysteriously vague and barely visible "facts"

for instance, camera pans in on stratified ice melting glacier. gore’s comedic overvoice drolling, "you can see each ice layer for each year", (but there is no scale so you can’t tell if the layers are ten feet thick, five feet thick, one foot thick? then he says, "we can test ice core samples backwards of 650,000 years"

well, if you do the basic math calculations, allotting one foot per year layer, we would have to have drilled over 123 miles into the earth’s surface

you can keep breaking it down if you’d like (changing the ice core layering numbers, but the point, i guess, is that when "we" have drilled, the ridiculously and all time farthest depth is less than 9 miles) so keep that in mind as you try to make up the facts to match al gore’s proposal

unfortunately, even dumbed down wikipedia adds some contradictions to al’s movie version: "The length of the record depends on the depth of the ice core and varies from a few years up to 800 kyr for the EPICA core. The time resolution (i.e. the shortest time period which can be accurately distinguished) depends on the amount of annual snowfall, and reduces with depth as the ice compacts under the weight of layers accumulating on top of it. Upper layers of ice in a core correspond to a single year or sometimes a single season. Deeper into the ice the layers thin and annual layers become indistinguishable." hmmmm. now that’s really different than the info he was saying. and frankly i think he’s not just full of shit, so are all the people who just jump into junk science because it’s sexy and contemporary. and hey, that IS ANY OF YOU who are just starting to crumble under the repetition of media catch phrases. but don’t blame yourselves or get angry at new information. i know, who has the time to cross reference anything anymore?

there is a startlingly good scene in the book Brave New World where one of the lead characters is told by one of the world leaders that science is bunk. he cries out, "but it’s the backbone of our society". the world leader then asks him what he really knows about science. beyond the jargan and propaganda, what does he really know of true, hard science? and he knows nothing and is ashamed and realizes that he really only knows stories about science, not true science

last night, i watched this movie with someone who kind of belives the same things as helmholtz watson (the dashing, over-intelligent outcast/untouchable… that’s right, the unavoidable corporate caste system — c’mon, you knew there was a reason that the xians and the islams are being pitted against each other, right?!).

periodically, i would stop the movie after one of al gore’s wordy explanations and say, "what does that mean? what did he just say?" not once could my compadre actually relay back the info that was said. so i would, verbatim and then i would ask again, "what does that mean?" but it was idiotic gibberish and had no meaning at all

and way too much of the movie is just sheer "clean up" propoganda. and whose pocket do you think al is in?

not sure if y’all get it but the war btwn the energy cartels and the new corporates is raging pretty damn fiercely in this economic pilot project we fondly call the united states

gore represents globalism and global views. bush is pretending to represent nationalism and nationalistic views (though we know that isn’t true), but he is also global — something like the patriot act (which deals heavily with online internet business, black market and tax evasion issues) would NEVER have passed in this county if he wasn’t involved in globalism at the deepest level — hell, i’m gonna make a NEW WORLD ORDER shirt today to honor his father’s catch phrase

problem/reaction/solution has become the manufacturing goal of the media and corporations are wildly at war with each other. the ability to use nations as human shields or weapons is increasing. humans are becoming weapons, living weapons. once again

if we all jumped heedlessly onto the "clean up" band wagon, we might find some new enlightenment. studies show, however, that "clean up" crew mentality is very lucrative for pocket buddy corporates that "shoot pool" with the politicians and make trade outs for big pay offs. cf the fct up stats from the exxon valdeez clean up if you don’t believe me (no, really, spend ten minutes and do some personal research!!!!!)

but, back to the movie. in ONE breath he states thtat we are politically obligated and MORALLY obligated AND ETHICALLY OBLIGATED to global warming — it’s obvious that includes all of you who aren’t anarchists!!!! you’re all being called to submit and bow down. damn. the anarchist is left out of the equation, AGAIN!

can anyone else smell a fking HUGE TARIFF coming?

have you paid your annual "global warming tax" yet? your share this year is 138,000 u.s dollars. we’ve just taken it from the federal reserve. you paid for it in iraq and at the gas pumps. we burned the money. your country will soon be dancing through a delicious recession until the next bill shows up. use credit. pay later. eat filter fish. take medications. sleep less. get angry all the time. drive your car recklessly

what an entertaining culture!!!!

i think fellini did a great job of interpreting petronius. in his film fellini’s satyricon", the poet refers to us, the viewer and the students in the film as a "race of slaves"

secretly, i prefer mr.huxley’s corporate translation of the same phrase: community, stability, identity

i promise to see the whole movie. maybe several times

my favorite part so far is when he uses the invisible lift to avoid showing how current temperatures correspond with the outrageous projections — i think i even shouted out, "donkey show" when i really meant to say "dog and pony show"

people either forget or don’t know that the little organisms in the ocean that "filter" all the stuff scientists call oxygen (hahaha) that we breathe, well, they’re taking strange vacations lately and going different ways than before for reasons that are related to basic change. revegetation, pattern shifts, industrialization, toxic waste (hey, even little organisms will move away from radioactive poison once they catch on), and so many other things contribute to a different migrational period for them. and weather weapons, which have been tested and used several times within the past five years are just normal outgrowths of comic book fantasies come to life through secret laboratories that fill our cities and communities with ideas and applications, education and doctored foods. it’s not new stuff, folks. none of it

and those little organisms that make all that oxygen will stabilize into "normal" patterns again. and what about the fking whales? and the sonar project that is devastating oceanic life and has been for the past decade? you know what i’m saying? there’s just info coming to the surface that SEEMS NEW and exciting and dangerous. but it isn’t really any of that

it’s just news UNLESS you have to pay for it. then, it’s time to watch the monkeys have their boston tea party

Cool Debt Application images

Cool Debt Application images

Some awesome credit report application photos:

IAEA Trains Veterinary Scientists (05510242)
credit application
< img alt=" credit scores application" src=" https://www.freecreditreportcompare.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/33525986986_0f7d305168.jpg" size=" 400"/ > Image by< a href= " http://www.flickr.com/photos/35068899@N03/33525986986" > IAEA Imagebank African Swine Fever is a highly transmittable condition that could cause a terrible impact on small pig farmers as well as can be transferred from pigs to people. The IAEA experienced veterinary scientists from the National Vet Research laboratory (LANAVET) in Yaoundé, Cameroon, to make use of nuclear-derived technology to promptly discover the existence of this virus. Early diagnosis assists farmers ensure they are much better prepared to respond at the very first indicator of a disease. Farmer feeds his pigs at the outskirts of Yaoundé, Cameroon. 3 March 2017

Picture Debt: Laura Gil Martinez/ IAEA

African Swine Fever (05510240)
credit application
< img alt="debt application"src ="https://www.freecreditreportcompare.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/32723247354_9394fc9919.jpg"size ="400"/ > Image by IAEA Imagebank African Swine High temperature is an extremely

transmittable illness that can trigger a damaging effect on small pig farmers as well as could be transferred from pigs to human beings. The IAEA trained vet scientists from the National Vet Laboratory(LANAVET) in Yaoundé, Cameroon, to make use of nuclear-derived modern technology to promptly discover the visibility of this infection. Early diagnosis aids farmers ensure they are much better prepared to react at the very first indicator of an illness. 3 March 2017. Photo Credit scores: Laura Gil Martinez/ IAEA

ASMR Credit Card Application Roleplay (Soft Spoken, Typing Sounds)

ASMR Credit Card Application Roleplay (Soft Spoken, Typing Sounds)

< iframe size= "425" height=" 355" src=" https://www.youtube.com/embed/pp5jxe9KhXw?rel=0" frameborder=" 0" allowfullscreen > ❤ REGISTER FOR MY VLOG CHANNEL https://www.youtube.com/amalzdvlogsxo ❤ Follow me on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/amalzd/ ❤ End up being a Client! https://www.patreon.com/amalzd ❤ Twitter https://twitter.com/deeshizniz ❤ Amazon Wishlist http://amzn.com/w/3CBWZ1BF7D2EH do you have 11 protons because you’re salt fine< iframe size=" 425" elevation=" 355" src=" https://www.youtube.com/embed/UyVWL5EnIZ0?rel=0" frameborder=" 0" allowfullscreen >

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Nice Credit Application photos

Nice Credit Application photos

Check out these credit application images:

Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – Son in the Tub
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Image by familymwr
Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – Son in the Tub

Photo By: MAJ Aaron Haney

To learn more about the annual U.S. Army Photography Competition, visit us online at www.armymwr.com

U.S. Army Arts and Crafts History

After World War I the reductions to the Army left the United States with a small force. The War Department faced monumental challenges in preparing for World War II. One of those challenges was soldier morale. Recreational activities for off duty time would be important. The arts and crafts program informally evolved to augment the needs of the War Department.
On January 9, 1941, the Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson, appointed Frederick H. Osborn, a prominent U.S. businessman and philanthropist, Chairman of the War Department Committee on Education, Recreation and Community Service.
In 1940 and 1941, the United States involvement in World War II was more of sympathy and anticipation than of action. However, many different types of institutions were looking for ways to help the war effort. The Museum of Modern Art in New York was one of these institutions. In April, 1941, the Museum announced a poster competition, “Posters for National Defense.” The directors stated “The Museum feels that in a time of national emergency the artists of a country are as important an asset as men skilled in other fields, and that the nation’s first-rate talent should be utilized by the government for its official design work… Discussions have been held with officials of the Army and the Treasury who have expressed remarkable enthusiasm…”
In May 1941, the Museum exhibited “Britain at War”, a show selected by Sir Kenneth Clark, director of the National Gallery in London. The “Prize-Winning Defense Posters” were exhibited in July through September concurrently with “Britain at War.” The enormous overnight growth of the military force meant mobilization type construction at every camp. Construction was fast; facilities were not fancy; rather drab and depressing.
In 1941, the Fort Custer Army Illustrators, while on strenuous war games maneuvers in Tennessee, documented the exercise The Bulletin of the Museum of Modern Art, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Feb. 1942), described their work. “Results were astonishingly good; they showed serious devotion …to the purpose of depicting the Army scene with unvarnished realism and a remarkable ability to capture this scene from the soldier’s viewpoint. Civilian amateur and professional artists had been transformed into soldier-artists. Reality and straightforward documentation had supplanted (replaced) the old romantic glorification and false dramatization of war and the slick suavity (charm) of commercial drawing.”

“In August of last year, Fort Custer Army Illustrators held an exhibition, the first of its kind in the new Army, at the Camp Service Club. Soldiers who saw the exhibition, many of whom had never been inside an art gallery, enjoyed it thoroughly. Civilian visitors, too, came and admired. The work of the group showed them a new aspect of the Army; there were many phases of Army life they had never seen or heard of before. Newspapers made much of it and, most important, the Army approved. Army officials saw that it was not only authentic material, but that here was a source of enlivenment (vitalization) to the Army and a vivid medium for conveying the Army’s purposes and processes to civilians and soldiers.”
Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn and War Department leaders were concerned because few soldiers were using the off duty recreation areas that were available. Army commanders recognized that efficiency is directly correlated with morale, and that morale is largely determined from the manner in which an individual spends his own free time. Army morale enhancement through positive off duty recreation programs is critical in combat staging areas.
To encourage soldier use of programs, the facilities drab and uninviting environment had to be improved. A program utilizing talented artists and craftsmen to decorate day rooms, mess halls, recreation halls and other places of general assembly was established by the Facilities Section of Special Services. The purpose was to provide an environment that would reflect the military tradition, accomplishments and the high standard of army life. The fact that this work was to be done by the men themselves had the added benefit of contributing to the esprit de corps (teamwork, or group spirit) of the unit.
The plan was first tested in October of 1941, at Camp Davis, North Carolina. A studio workshop was set up and a group of soldier artists were placed on special duty to design and decorate the facilities. Additionally, evening recreation art classes were scheduled three times a week. A second test was established at Fort Belvoir, Virginia a month later. The success of these programs lead to more installations requesting the program.
After Pearl Harbor was bombed, the Museum of Modern Art appointed Mr. James Soby, to the position of Director of the Armed Service Program on January 15, 1942. The subsequent program became a combination of occupational therapy, exhibitions and morale-sustaining activities.
Through the efforts of Mr. Soby, the museum program included; a display of Fort Custer Army Illustrators work from February through April 5, 1942. The museum also included the work of soldier-photographers in this exhibit. On May 6, 1942, Mr. Soby opened an art sale of works donated by museum members. The sale was to raise funds for the Soldier Art Program of Special Services Division. The bulk of these proceeds were to be used to provide facilities and materials for soldier artists in Army camps throughout the country.
Members of the Museum had responded with paintings, sculptures, watercolors, gouaches, drawings, etchings and lithographs. Hundreds of works were received, including oils by Winslow Homer, Orozco, John Kane, Speicher, Eilshemius, de Chirico; watercolors by Burchfield and Dufy; drawings by Augustus John, Forain and Berman, and prints by Cezanne, Lautrec, Matisse and Bellows. The War Department plan using soldier-artists to decorate and improve buildings and grounds worked. Many artists who had been drafted into the Army volunteered to paint murals in waiting rooms and clubs, to decorate dayrooms, and to landscape grounds. For each artist at work there were a thousand troops who watched. These bystanders clamored to participate, and classes in drawing, painting, sculpture and photography were offered. Larger working space and more instructors were required to meet the growing demand. Civilian art instructors and local communities helped to meet this cultural need, by providing volunteer instruction and facilities.
Some proceeds from the Modern Museum of Art sale were used to print 25,000 booklets called “Interior Design and Soldier Art.” The booklet showed examples of soldier-artist murals that decorated places of general assembly. It was a guide to organizing, planning and executing the soldier-artist program. The balance of the art sale proceeds were used to purchase the initial arts and crafts furnishings for 350 Army installations in the USA.
In November, 1942, General Somervell directed that a group of artists be selected and dispatched to active theaters to paint war scenes with the stipulation that soldier artists would not paint in lieu of military duties.
Aileen Osborn Webb, sister of Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn, launched the American Crafts Council in 1943. She was an early champion of the Army program.
While soldiers were participating in fixed facilities in the USA, many troops were being shipped overseas to Europe and the Pacific (1942-1945). They had long periods of idleness and waiting in staging areas. At that time the wounded were lying in hospitals, both on land and in ships at sea. The War Department and Red Cross responded by purchasing kits of arts and crafts tools and supplies to distribute to “these restless personnel.” A variety of small “Handicraft Kits” were distributed free of charge. Leathercraft, celluloid etching, knotting and braiding, metal tooling, drawing and clay modeling are examples of the types of kits sent.
In January, 1944, the Interior Design Soldier Artist program was more appropriately named the “Arts and Crafts Section” of Special Services. The mission was “to fulfill the natural human desire to create, provide opportunities for self-expression, serve old skills and develop new ones, and assist the entire recreation program through construction work, publicity, and decoration.”
The National Army Art Contest was planned for the late fall of 1944. In June of 1945, the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., for the first time in its history opened its facilities for the exhibition of the soldier art and photography submitted to this contest. The “Infantry Journal, Inc.” printed a small paperback booklet containing 215 photographs of pictures exhibited in the National Gallery of Art.
In August of 1944, the Museum of Modern Art, Armed Forces Program, organized an art center for veterans. Abby Rockefeller, in particular, had a strong interest in this project. Soldiers were invited to sketch, paint, or model under the guidance of skilled artists and craftsmen. Victor d’Amico, who was in charge of the Museum’s Education Department, was quoted in Russell Lynes book, Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art. “I asked one fellow why he had taken up art and he said, Well, I just came back from destroying everything. I made up my mind that if I ever got out of the Army and out of the war I was never going to destroy another thing in my life, and I decided that art was the thing that I would do.” Another man said to d’Amico, “Art is like a good night’s sleep. You come away refreshed and at peace.”
In late October, 1944, an Arts and Crafts Branch of Special Services Division, Headquarters, European Theater of Operations was established. A versatile program of handcrafts flourished among the Army occupation troops.
The increased interest in crafts, rather than fine arts, at this time lead to a new name for the program: The “Handicrafts Branch.”
In 1945, the War Department published a new manual, “Soldier Handicrafts”, to help implement this new emphasis. The manual contained instructions for setting up crafts facilities, selecting as well as improvising tools and equipment, and basic information on a variety of arts and crafts.
As the Army moved from a combat to a peacetime role, the majority of crafts shops in the United States were equipped with woodworking power machinery for construction of furnishings and objects for personal living. Based on this new trend, in 1946 the program was again renamed, this time as “Manual Arts.”
At the same time, overseas programs were now employing local artists and craftsmen to operate the crafts facilities and instruct in a variety of arts and crafts. These highly skilled, indigenous instructors helped to stimulate the soldiers’ interest in the respective native cultures and artifacts. Thousands of troops overseas were encouraged to record their experiences on film. These photographs provided an invaluable means of communication between troops and their families back home.
When the war ended, the Navy had a firm of architects and draftsmen on contract to design ships. Since there was no longer a need for more ships, they were given a new assignment: To develop a series of instructional guides for arts and crafts. These were called “Hobby Manuals.” The Army was impressed with the quality of the Navy manuals and had them reprinted and adopted for use by Army troops. By 1948, the arts and crafts practiced throughout the Army were so varied and diverse that the program was renamed “Hobby Shops.” The first “Interservice Photography Contest” was held in 1948. Each service is eligible to send two years of their winning entries forward for the bi-annual interservice contest. In 1949, the first All Army Crafts Contest was also held. Once again, it was clear that the program title, “Hobby Shops” was misleading and overlapped into other forms of recreation.
In January, 1951, the program was designated as “The Army Crafts Program.” The program was recognized as an essential Army recreation activity along with sports, libraries, service clubs, soldier shows and soldier music. In the official statement of mission, professional leadership was emphasized to insure a balanced, progressive schedule of arts and crafts would be conducted in well-equipped, attractive facilities on all Army installations.
The program was now defined in terms of a “Basic Seven Program” which included: drawing and painting; ceramics and sculpture; metal work; leathercrafts; model building; photography and woodworking. These programs were to be conducted regularly in facilities known as the “multiple-type crafts shop.” For functional reasons, these facilities were divided into three separate technical areas for woodworking, photography and the arts and crafts.
During the Korean Conflict, the Army Crafts program utilized the personnel and shops in Japan to train soldiers to instruct crafts in Korea.
The mid-1950s saw more soldiers with cars and the need to repair their vehicles was recognized at Fort Carson, Colorado, by the craft director. Soldiers familiar with crafts shops knew that they had tools and so automotive crafts were established. By 1958, the Engineers published an Official Design Guide on Crafts Shops and Auto Crafts Shops. In 1959, the first All Army Art Contest was held. Once more, the Army Crafts Program responded to the needs of soldiers.
In the 1960’s, the war in Vietnam was a new challenge for the Army Crafts Program. The program had three levels of support; fixed facilities, mobile trailers designed as portable photo labs, and once again a “Kit Program.” The kit program originated at Headquarters, Department of Army, and it proved to be very popular with soldiers.
Tom Turner, today a well-known studio potter, was a soldier at Ft. Jackson, South Carolina in the 1960s. In the December 1990 / January 1991 “American Crafts” magazine, Turner, who had been a graduate student in art school when he was drafted, said the program was “a godsend.”
The Army Artist Program was re-initiated in cooperation with the Office of Military History to document the war in Vietnam. Soldier-artists were identified and teams were formed to draw and paint the events of this combat. Exhibitions of these soldier-artist works were produced and toured throughout the USA.
In 1970, the original name of the program, “Arts and Crafts”, was restored. In 1971, the “Arts and Crafts/Skills Development Program” was established for budget presentations and construction projects.
After the Vietnam demobilization, a new emphasis was placed on service to families and children of soldiers. To meet this new challenge in an environment of funding constraints the arts and crafts program began charging fees for classes. More part-time personnel were used to teach formal classes. Additionally, a need for more technical-vocational skills training for military personnel was met by close coordination with Army Education Programs. Army arts and crafts directors worked with soldiers during “Project Transition” to develop soldier skills for new careers in the public sector.
The main challenge in the 1980s and 90s was, and is, to become “self-sustaining.” Directors have been forced to find more ways to generate increased revenue to help defray the loss of appropriated funds and to cover the non-appropriated funds expenses of the program. Programs have added and increased emphasis on services such as, picture framing, gallery sales, engraving and trophy sales, etc… New programs such as multi-media computer graphics appeal to customers of the 1990’s.
The Gulf War presented the Army with some familiar challenges such as personnel off duty time in staging areas. Department of Army volunteer civilian recreation specialists were sent to Saudi Arabia in January, 1991, to organize recreation programs. Arts and crafts supplies were sent to the theater. An Army Humor Cartoon Contest was conducted for the soldiers in the Gulf, and arts and crafts programs were set up to meet soldier interests.
The increased operations tempo of the ‘90’s Army has once again placed emphasis on meeting the “recreation needs of deployed soldiers.” Arts and crafts activities and a variety of programs are assets commanders must have to meet the deployment challenges of these very different scenarios.
The Army arts and crafts program, no matter what it has been titled, has made some unique contributions for the military and our society in general. Army arts and crafts does not fit the narrow definition of drawing and painting or making ceramics, but the much larger sense of arts and crafts. It is painting and drawing. It also encompasses:
* all forms of design. (fabric, clothes, household appliances, dishes, vases, houses, automobiles, landscapes, computers, copy machines, desks, industrial machines, weapon systems, air crafts, roads, etc…)
* applied technology (photography, graphics, woodworking, sculpture, metal smithing, weaving and textiles, sewing, advertising, enameling, stained glass, pottery, charts, graphs, visual aides and even formats for correspondence…)
* a way of making learning fun, practical and meaningful (through the process of designing and making an object the creator must decide which materials and techniques to use, thereby engaging in creative problem solving and discovery) skills taught have military applications.
* a way to acquire quality items and save money by doing-it-yourself (making furniture, gifts, repairing things …).
* a way to pursue college credit, through on post classes.
* a universal and non-verbal language (a picture is worth a thousand words).
* food for the human psyche, an element of morale that allows for individual expression (freedom).
* the celebration of human spirit and excellence (our highest form of public recognition is through a dedicated monument).
* physical and mental therapy (motor skill development, stress reduction, etc…).
* an activity that promotes self-reliance and self-esteem.
* the record of mankind, and in this case, of the Army.
What would the world be like today if this generally unknown program had not existed? To quantitatively state the overall impact of this program on the world is impossible. Millions of soldier citizens have been directly and indirectly exposed to arts and crafts because this program existed. One activity, photography can provide a clue to its impact. Soldiers encouraged to take pictures, beginning with WW II, have shared those images with family and friends. Classes in “How to Use a Camera” to “How to Develop Film and Print Pictures” were instrumental in soldiers seeing the results of using quality equipment. A good camera and lens could make a big difference in the quality of the print. They bought the top of the line equipment. When they were discharged from the Army or home on leave this new equipment was showed to the family and friends. Without this encouragement and exposure to photography many would not have recorded their personal experiences or known the difference quality equipment could make. Families and friends would not have had the opportunity to “see” the environment their soldier was living in without these photos. Germany, Italy, Korea, Japan, Panama, etc… were far away places that most had not visited.
As the twenty first century approaches, the predictions for an arts renaissance by Megatrends 2000 seem realistic based on the Army Arts and Crafts Program practical experience. In the April ‘95 issue of “American Demographics” magazine, an article titled “Generation X” fully supports that this is indeed the case today. Television and computers have greatly contributed to “Generation X” being more interested in the visual arts and crafts.
Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – Eye of the Holder
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Image by familymwr
Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – Eye of the Holder

Photo By: SGT Pablo Piedra

To learn more about the annual U.S. Army Photography Competition, visit us online at www.armymwr.com

U.S. Army Arts and Crafts History
After World War I the reductions to the Army left the United States with a small force. The War Department faced monumental challenges in preparing for World War II. One of those challenges was soldier morale. Recreational activities for off duty time would be important. The arts and crafts program informally evolved to augment the needs of the War Department.
On January 9, 1941, the Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson, appointed Frederick H. Osborn, a prominent U.S. businessman and philanthropist, Chairman of the War Department Committee on Education, Recreation and Community Service.
In 1940 and 1941, the United States involvement in World War II was more of sympathy and anticipation than of action. However, many different types of institutions were looking for ways to help the war effort. The Museum of Modern Art in New York was one of these institutions. In April, 1941, the Museum announced a poster competition, “Posters for National Defense.” The directors stated “The Museum feels that in a time of national emergency the artists of a country are as important an asset as men skilled in other fields, and that the nation’s first-rate talent should be utilized by the government for its official design work… Discussions have been held with officials of the Army and the Treasury who have expressed remarkable enthusiasm…”
In May 1941, the Museum exhibited “Britain at War”, a show selected by Sir Kenneth Clark, director of the National Gallery in London. The “Prize-Winning Defense Posters” were exhibited in July through September concurrently with “Britain at War.” The enormous overnight growth of the military force meant mobilization type construction at every camp. Construction was fast; facilities were not fancy; rather drab and depressing.
In 1941, the Fort Custer Army Illustrators, while on strenuous war games maneuvers in Tennessee, documented the exercise The Bulletin of the Museum of Modern Art, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Feb. 1942), described their work. “Results were astonishingly good; they showed serious devotion …to the purpose of depicting the Army scene with unvarnished realism and a remarkable ability to capture this scene from the soldier’s viewpoint. Civilian amateur and professional artists had been transformed into soldier-artists. Reality and straightforward documentation had supplanted (replaced) the old romantic glorification and false dramatization of war and the slick suavity (charm) of commercial drawing.”

“In August of last year, Fort Custer Army Illustrators held an exhibition, the first of its kind in the new Army, at the Camp Service Club. Soldiers who saw the exhibition, many of whom had never been inside an art gallery, enjoyed it thoroughly. Civilian visitors, too, came and admired. The work of the group showed them a new aspect of the Army; there were many phases of Army life they had never seen or heard of before. Newspapers made much of it and, most important, the Army approved. Army officials saw that it was not only authentic material, but that here was a source of enlivenment (vitalization) to the Army and a vivid medium for conveying the Army’s purposes and processes to civilians and soldiers.”
Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn and War Department leaders were concerned because few soldiers were using the off duty recreation areas that were available. Army commanders recognized that efficiency is directly correlated with morale, and that morale is largely determined from the manner in which an individual spends his own free time. Army morale enhancement through positive off duty recreation programs is critical in combat staging areas.
To encourage soldier use of programs, the facilities drab and uninviting environment had to be improved. A program utilizing talented artists and craftsmen to decorate day rooms, mess halls, recreation halls and other places of general assembly was established by the Facilities Section of Special Services. The purpose was to provide an environment that would reflect the military tradition, accomplishments and the high standard of army life. The fact that this work was to be done by the men themselves had the added benefit of contributing to the esprit de corps (teamwork, or group spirit) of the unit.
The plan was first tested in October of 1941, at Camp Davis, North Carolina. A studio workshop was set up and a group of soldier artists were placed on special duty to design and decorate the facilities. Additionally, evening recreation art classes were scheduled three times a week. A second test was established at Fort Belvoir, Virginia a month later. The success of these programs lead to more installations requesting the program.
After Pearl Harbor was bombed, the Museum of Modern Art appointed Mr. James Soby, to the position of Director of the Armed Service Program on January 15, 1942. The subsequent program became a combination of occupational therapy, exhibitions and morale-sustaining activities.
Through the efforts of Mr. Soby, the museum program included; a display of Fort Custer Army Illustrators work from February through April 5, 1942. The museum also included the work of soldier-photographers in this exhibit. On May 6, 1942, Mr. Soby opened an art sale of works donated by museum members. The sale was to raise funds for the Soldier Art Program of Special Services Division. The bulk of these proceeds were to be used to provide facilities and materials for soldier artists in Army camps throughout the country.
Members of the Museum had responded with paintings, sculptures, watercolors, gouaches, drawings, etchings and lithographs. Hundreds of works were received, including oils by Winslow Homer, Orozco, John Kane, Speicher, Eilshemius, de Chirico; watercolors by Burchfield and Dufy; drawings by Augustus John, Forain and Berman, and prints by Cezanne, Lautrec, Matisse and Bellows. The War Department plan using soldier-artists to decorate and improve buildings and grounds worked. Many artists who had been drafted into the Army volunteered to paint murals in waiting rooms and clubs, to decorate dayrooms, and to landscape grounds. For each artist at work there were a thousand troops who watched. These bystanders clamored to participate, and classes in drawing, painting, sculpture and photography were offered. Larger working space and more instructors were required to meet the growing demand. Civilian art instructors and local communities helped to meet this cultural need, by providing volunteer instruction and facilities.
Some proceeds from the Modern Museum of Art sale were used to print 25,000 booklets called “Interior Design and Soldier Art.” The booklet showed examples of soldier-artist murals that decorated places of general assembly. It was a guide to organizing, planning and executing the soldier-artist program. The balance of the art sale proceeds were used to purchase the initial arts and crafts furnishings for 350 Army installations in the USA.
In November, 1942, General Somervell directed that a group of artists be selected and dispatched to active theaters to paint war scenes with the stipulation that soldier artists would not paint in lieu of military duties.
Aileen Osborn Webb, sister of Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn, launched the American Crafts Council in 1943. She was an early champion of the Army program.
While soldiers were participating in fixed facilities in the USA, many troops were being shipped overseas to Europe and the Pacific (1942-1945). They had long periods of idleness and waiting in staging areas. At that time the wounded were lying in hospitals, both on land and in ships at sea. The War Department and Red Cross responded by purchasing kits of arts and crafts tools and supplies to distribute to “these restless personnel.” A variety of small “Handicraft Kits” were distributed free of charge. Leathercraft, celluloid etching, knotting and braiding, metal tooling, drawing and clay modeling are examples of the types of kits sent.
In January, 1944, the Interior Design Soldier Artist program was more appropriately named the “Arts and Crafts Section” of Special Services. The mission was “to fulfill the natural human desire to create, provide opportunities for self-expression, serve old skills and develop new ones, and assist the entire recreation program through construction work, publicity, and decoration.”
The National Army Art Contest was planned for the late fall of 1944. In June of 1945, the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., for the first time in its history opened its facilities for the exhibition of the soldier art and photography submitted to this contest. The “Infantry Journal, Inc.” printed a small paperback booklet containing 215 photographs of pictures exhibited in the National Gallery of Art.
In August of 1944, the Museum of Modern Art, Armed Forces Program, organized an art center for veterans. Abby Rockefeller, in particular, had a strong interest in this project. Soldiers were invited to sketch, paint, or model under the guidance of skilled artists and craftsmen. Victor d’Amico, who was in charge of the Museum’s Education Department, was quoted in Russell Lynes book, Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art. “I asked one fellow why he had taken up art and he said, Well, I just came back from destroying everything. I made up my mind that if I ever got out of the Army and out of the war I was never going to destroy another thing in my life, and I decided that art was the thing that I would do.” Another man said to d’Amico, “Art is like a good night’s sleep. You come away refreshed and at peace.”
In late October, 1944, an Arts and Crafts Branch of Special Services Division, Headquarters, European Theater of Operations was established. A versatile program of handcrafts flourished among the Army occupation troops.
The increased interest in crafts, rather than fine arts, at this time lead to a new name for the program: The “Handicrafts Branch.”
In 1945, the War Department published a new manual, “Soldier Handicrafts”, to help implement this new emphasis. The manual contained instructions for setting up crafts facilities, selecting as well as improvising tools and equipment, and basic information on a variety of arts and crafts.
As the Army moved from a combat to a peacetime role, the majority of crafts shops in the United States were equipped with woodworking power machinery for construction of furnishings and objects for personal living. Based on this new trend, in 1946 the program was again renamed, this time as “Manual Arts.”
At the same time, overseas programs were now employing local artists and craftsmen to operate the crafts facilities and instruct in a variety of arts and crafts. These highly skilled, indigenous instructors helped to stimulate the soldiers’ interest in the respective native cultures and artifacts. Thousands of troops overseas were encouraged to record their experiences on film. These photographs provided an invaluable means of communication between troops and their families back home.
When the war ended, the Navy had a firm of architects and draftsmen on contract to design ships. Since there was no longer a need for more ships, they were given a new assignment: To develop a series of instructional guides for arts and crafts. These were called “Hobby Manuals.” The Army was impressed with the quality of the Navy manuals and had them reprinted and adopted for use by Army troops. By 1948, the arts and crafts practiced throughout the Army were so varied and diverse that the program was renamed “Hobby Shops.” The first “Interservice Photography Contest” was held in 1948. Each service is eligible to send two years of their winning entries forward for the bi-annual interservice contest. In 1949, the first All Army Crafts Contest was also held. Once again, it was clear that the program title, “Hobby Shops” was misleading and overlapped into other forms of recreation.
In January, 1951, the program was designated as “The Army Crafts Program.” The program was recognized as an essential Army recreation activity along with sports, libraries, service clubs, soldier shows and soldier music. In the official statement of mission, professional leadership was emphasized to insure a balanced, progressive schedule of arts and crafts would be conducted in well-equipped, attractive facilities on all Army installations.
The program was now defined in terms of a “Basic Seven Program” which included: drawing and painting; ceramics and sculpture; metal work; leathercrafts; model building; photography and woodworking. These programs were to be conducted regularly in facilities known as the “multiple-type crafts shop.” For functional reasons, these facilities were divided into three separate technical areas for woodworking, photography and the arts and crafts.
During the Korean Conflict, the Army Crafts program utilized the personnel and shops in Japan to train soldiers to instruct crafts in Korea.
The mid-1950s saw more soldiers with cars and the need to repair their vehicles was recognized at Fort Carson, Colorado, by the craft director. Soldiers familiar with crafts shops knew that they had tools and so automotive crafts were established. By 1958, the Engineers published an Official Design Guide on Crafts Shops and Auto Crafts Shops. In 1959, the first All Army Art Contest was held. Once more, the Army Crafts Program responded to the needs of soldiers.
In the 1960’s, the war in Vietnam was a new challenge for the Army Crafts Program. The program had three levels of support; fixed facilities, mobile trailers designed as portable photo labs, and once again a “Kit Program.” The kit program originated at Headquarters, Department of Army, and it proved to be very popular with soldiers.
Tom Turner, today a well-known studio potter, was a soldier at Ft. Jackson, South Carolina in the 1960s. In the December 1990 / January 1991 “American Crafts” magazine, Turner, who had been a graduate student in art school when he was drafted, said the program was “a godsend.”
The Army Artist Program was re-initiated in cooperation with the Office of Military History to document the war in Vietnam. Soldier-artists were identified and teams were formed to draw and paint the events of this combat. Exhibitions of these soldier-artist works were produced and toured throughout the USA.
In 1970, the original name of the program, “Arts and Crafts”, was restored. In 1971, the “Arts and Crafts/Skills Development Program” was established for budget presentations and construction projects.
After the Vietnam demobilization, a new emphasis was placed on service to families and children of soldiers. To meet this new challenge in an environment of funding constraints the arts and crafts program began charging fees for classes. More part-time personnel were used to teach formal classes. Additionally, a need for more technical-vocational skills training for military personnel was met by close coordination with Army Education Programs. Army arts and crafts directors worked with soldiers during “Project Transition” to develop soldier skills for new careers in the public sector.
The main challenge in the 1980s and 90s was, and is, to become “self-sustaining.” Directors have been forced to find more ways to generate increased revenue to help defray the loss of appropriated funds and to cover the non-appropriated funds expenses of the program. Programs have added and increased emphasis on services such as, picture framing, gallery sales, engraving and trophy sales, etc… New programs such as multi-media computer graphics appeal to customers of the 1990’s.
The Gulf War presented the Army with some familiar challenges such as personnel off duty time in staging areas. Department of Army volunteer civilian recreation specialists were sent to Saudi Arabia in January, 1991, to organize recreation programs. Arts and crafts supplies were sent to the theater. An Army Humor Cartoon Contest was conducted for the soldiers in the Gulf, and arts and crafts programs were set up to meet soldier interests.
The increased operations tempo of the ‘90’s Army has once again placed emphasis on meeting the “recreation needs of deployed soldiers.” Arts and crafts activities and a variety of programs are assets commanders must have to meet the deployment challenges of these very different scenarios.
The Army arts and crafts program, no matter what it has been titled, has made some unique contributions for the military and our society in general. Army arts and crafts does not fit the narrow definition of drawing and painting or making ceramics, but the much larger sense of arts and crafts. It is painting and drawing. It also encompasses:
* all forms of design. (fabric, clothes, household appliances, dishes, vases, houses, automobiles, landscapes, computers, copy machines, desks, industrial machines, weapon systems, air crafts, roads, etc…)
* applied technology (photography, graphics, woodworking, sculpture, metal smithing, weaving and textiles, sewing, advertising, enameling, stained glass, pottery, charts, graphs, visual aides and even formats for correspondence…)
* a way of making learning fun, practical and meaningful (through the process of designing and making an object the creator must decide which materials and techniques to use, thereby engaging in creative problem solving and discovery) skills taught have military applications.
* a way to acquire quality items and save money by doing-it-yourself (making furniture, gifts, repairing things …).
* a way to pursue college credit, through on post classes.
* a universal and non-verbal language (a picture is worth a thousand words).
* food for the human psyche, an element of morale that allows for individual expression (freedom).
* the celebration of human spirit and excellence (our highest form of public recognition is through a dedicated monument).
* physical and mental therapy (motor skill development, stress reduction, etc…).
* an activity that promotes self-reliance and self-esteem.
* the record of mankind, and in this case, of the Army.
What would the world be like today if this generally unknown program had not existed? To quantitatively state the overall impact of this program on the world is impossible. Millions of soldier citizens have been directly and indirectly exposed to arts and crafts because this program existed. One activity, photography can provide a clue to its impact. Soldiers encouraged to take pictures, beginning with WW II, have shared those images with family and friends. Classes in “How to Use a Camera” to “How to Develop Film and Print Pictures” were instrumental in soldiers seeing the results of using quality equipment. A good camera and lens could make a big difference in the quality of the print. They bought the top of the line equipment. When they were discharged from the Army or home on leave this new equipment was showed to the family and friends. Without this encouragement and exposure to photography many would not have recorded their personal experiences or known the difference quality equipment could make. Families and friends would not have had the opportunity to “see” the environment their soldier was living in without these photos. Germany, Italy, Korea, Japan, Panama, etc… were far away places that most had not visited.
As the twenty first century approaches, the predictions for an arts renaissance by Megatrends 2000 seem realistic based on the Army Arts and Crafts Program practical experience. In the April ‘95 issue of “American Demographics” magazine, an article titled “Generation X” fully supports that this is indeed the case today. Television and computers have greatly contributed to “Generation X” being more interested in the visual arts and crafts.
Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

A Chilling Innovation
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Image by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory – PNNL
Beating the heat might become a little easier, thanks to a new material developed at PNNL that offers outstanding refrigerant capacity and high thermal conductivity. The novel material shows promise for many advanced chiller applications, including air conditioning in buildings, U.S. Navy vessels and automobiles, as well as for power generation. The tiny structure is a metal organic framework—or MOF—overlaid on a porous carbon material using a unique method developed by PNNL. While the material development was initially funded through PNNL’s Laboratory Directed Research and Development program, further development and synthetic methods to scale up production and enhance performance are being supported by the U.S. Navy Military Sealift Command and DOE’s Geothermal Technologies Office.

Research Team: Radha Kishan Motkuri, Jagannadha Bontha, Rama Sesha Vemuri and Pete McGrail (PNNL).

This image was captured by Shuttha Shutthanandan with a Helium Ion Microscope at EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a DOE national user facility at PNNL.

A free PDF calendar with this image is available for download on PNNL.gov: www.pnnl.gov/publications/calendars/

Terms of Use: Our images are freely and publicly available for use with the credit line, "Courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory." Please use provided caption information for use in appropriate context.

Understanding Credit – How to Help Get Your Credit Application Approved

Understanding Credit – How to Help Get Your Credit Application Approved

We’ll give you some background on what lenders are looking for when they review credit applications, plus some helpful tips on how to make sure you’re applying for the credit card that’s right for you.

Learn more about Understanding Credit at:
http://www.understanding-credit.ca/cem/
Video Rating: / 5

Military Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts as well as Crafts – A Plumpish Percentage

Military Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts as well as Crafts – A Plumpish Percentage

Some amazing credit application images:

Army Digital photography Competition – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – A Plumpish Percentage
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< img alt=" credit report application" src=" https://www.freecreditreportcompare.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/4930276154_5351421904.jpg" width=" 400"/ > Photo by< a href= " http://www.flickr.com/photos/36196762@N04/4930276154" > familymwr Military Photography Competition – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and also Crafts – A Plumpish Percentage

Picture By: SSG Robert Stewart

To read more concerning the yearly UNITED STATE Military Digital photography Competition, see us online at www.armymwr.com

U.S. Army Arts as well as Crafts History

After World war the reductions to the Army left the United States with a little force. The Battle Division encountered significant challenges in planning for World Battle II. One of those obstacles was soldier morale. Leisure activities for off task time would certainly be vital. The arts as well as crafts program informally developed to enhance the demands of the Battle Department.
On January 9, 1941, the Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson, selected Frederick H. Osborn, a popular U.S. business owner as well as philanthropist, Chairman of the Battle Department Board on Education and learning, Recreation and also Area Service.
In 1940 as well as 1941, the USA participation in The second world war was even more of sympathy and expectancy compared to of action. Nevertheless, several sorts of organizations were trying to find ways to aid the battle initiative. The Museum of Modern Art in New york city was among these establishments. In April, 1941, the Museum introduced a poster competition, “Posters for National Protection.” The supervisors mentioned “The Museum feels that in a time of national emergency situation the musicians of a country are as essential a property as males proficient in other areas, which the nation’s top-notch talent need to be utilized by the federal government for its main design work … Conversations have been held with authorities of the Army and the Treasury who have expressed impressive interest …”.
In Might 1941, the Gallery showed “Britain at War”, a program picked by Sir Kenneth Clark, director of the National Gallery in London. The “Champion Defense Posters” were exhibited in July through September concurrently with “Britain at War.” The huge over night development of the armed forces force indicated mobilization kind building at every camp. Building was quickly; facilities were not expensive; rather boring and also gloomy.
In 1941, the Fort Custer Army Illustrators, while on laborious dry run maneuvers in Tennessee, recorded the exercise The Publication of the Museum of Modern Art, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Feb. 1942), described their work. “Results were amazingly great; they showed serious devotion … to the objective of depicting the Military scene with sincere realistic look and an exceptional ability to record this scene from the soldier’s perspective. Private amateur and also professional musicians had been changed into soldier-artists. Fact as well as uncomplicated documents had actually replaced (changed) the old charming glorification and false drama of war as well as the glossy suavity (appeal) of industrial illustration.”.

” In August of in 2014, Fort Custer Military Illustrators held an exhibit, the first of its kind in the brand-new Army, at the Camp Solution Club. Soldiers who saw the exhibition, a number of whom had actually never been inside an art gallery, appreciated it completely. Civilian site visitors, as well, came and also appreciated. The job of the group revealed them a brand-new facet of the Military; there were numerous phases of Army life they had never ever seen or come across in the past. Newspapers made much of it and also, crucial, the Army approved. Army officials saw that it was not just authentic product, but that right here provided enlivenment (vitalization) to the Army as well as a vibrant tool for conveying the Army’s functions and also procedures to private citizens and soldiers.”.
Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn and also War Division leaders were worried because few soldiers were utilizing the off task leisure areas that were readily available. Army leaders acknowledged that effectiveness is straight associated with spirits, which morale is mostly determined from the fashion where a private spends his own totally free time. Army morale enhancement through positive off task recreation programs is vital in combat staging locations.
To encourage soldier use programs, the centers boring and nasty atmosphere needed to be enhanced. A program using gifted musicians and craftsmen to enhance day spaces, mess halls, entertainment halls and also various other areas of general setting up was developed by the Facilities Area of Special Solutions. The purpose was to offer an atmosphere that would show the army tradition, accomplishments and the high criterion of army life. The fact that this work was to be done by the males themselves had the included advantage of contributing to the camaraderie (teamwork, or group spirit) of the unit.
The plan was very first examined in October of 1941, at Camp Davis, North Carolina. A studio workshop was set up as well as a team of soldier artists were positioned on unique task to layout and also enhance the centers. Furthermore, evening recreation art classes were set up three times a week. A second examination was developed at Fort Belvoir, Virginia a month later. The success of these programs bring about even more setups asking for the program.
After Pearl Harbor was bombed, the Gallery of Modern Art assigned Mr. James Soby, to the placement of Supervisor of the Armed Service Program on January 15, 1942. The subsequent program became a mix of work therapy, exhibits and morale-sustaining activities.
With the efforts of Mr. Soby, the gallery program consisted of; a display of Ft Custer Military Illustrators job from February through April 5, 1942. The gallery also included the job of soldier-photographers in this exhibit. On May 6, 1942, Mr. Soby opened an art sale of jobs contributed by museum participants. The sale was to increase funds for the Soldier Art Program of Unique Providers Department. The bulk of these earnings were to be used to offer facilities as well as materials for soldier musicians in Army camps throughout the nation.
Members of the Gallery had actually reacted with paintings, sculptures, watercolors, gouaches, illustrations, etchings as well as lithographs. Numerous works were gotten, including oils by Winslow Homer, Orozco, John Kane, Speicher, Eilshemius, de Chirico; watercolors by Burchfield and also Dufy; illustrations by Augustus John, Forain and Berman, as well as prints by Cezanne, Lautrec, Matisse and also Bellows. The Battle Division strategy utilizing soldier-artists to enhance and also improve structures and grounds worked. Lots of artists that had actually been prepared right into the Military volunteered to painting murals in waiting spaces and also clubs, to decorate dayrooms, and also to landscape grounds. For every musician at the workplace there were a thousand troops who enjoyed. These spectators shouted to participate, as well as courses in drawing, painting, sculpture and digital photography were supplied. Bigger working area and even more instructors were called for to meet the expanding demand. Civilian art instructors and regional neighborhoods aided to fulfill this social demand, by giving volunteer instruction and also centers.
Some earnings from the Modern Museum of Art sale were made use of to print 25,000 pamphlets called “Interior decoration as well as Soldier Art.” The booklet showed instances of soldier-artist murals that enhanced places of basic assembly. It was an overview of organizing, planning and implementing the soldier-artist program. The equilibrium of the art sale proceeds were made use of to buy the initial arts as well as crafts home furnishings for 350 Military setups in the USA.
In November, 1942, General Somervell directed that a group of artists be selected as well as dispatched to energetic cinemas to repaint war scenes with the terms that soldier artists would not paint in lieu of armed forces duties.
Aileen Osborn Webb, sis of Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn, introduced the American Crafts Council in 1943. She was an early champ of the Army program.
While soldiers were taking part in dealt with facilities in the USA, numerous troops were being delivered overseas to Europe and also the Pacific (1942-1945). They had extended periods of inactivity as well as waiting in staging locations. During that time the wounded were existing in health centers, both ashore and in ships at sea. The War Department and Red Cross responded by buying packages of arts as well as crafts devices as well as supplies to distribute to “these agitated employees.” A selection of small “Invention Sets” were distributed cost free. Leathercraft, celluloid etching, binding as well as intertwining, metal tooling, drawing as well as clay modeling are instances of the sorts of kits sent out.
In January, 1944, the Interior decoration Soldier Musician program was more appropriately called the “Arts as well as Crafts Section” of Special Providers. The mission was “to accomplish the natural human need to create, supply opportunities for self-expression, serve old abilities and also develop brand-new ones, and also assist the entire entertainment program through construction job, attention, as well as decoration.”.
The National Army Art Contest was planned for the late fall of 1944. In June of 1945, the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., for the very first time in its history opened its centers for the event of the soldier art and digital photography sent to this contest. The “Infantry Journal, Inc.” printed a tiny book pamphlet including 215 pictures of images exhibited in the National Gallery of Art.
In August of 1944, the Museum of Modern Art, Armed Forces Program, arranged an art center for professionals. Abby Rockefeller, in specific, had a solid rate of interest in this job. Soldiers were invited to illustration, paint, or version under the guidance of competent musicians as well as craftsmen. Victor d’Amico, that supervised of the Museum’s Education and learning Department, was priced estimate in Russell Lynes publication, Good Old Modern: An Intimate Picture of the Museum of Modern Art. “I asked one other why he had actually used up art as well as he claimed, Well, I just returned from destroying every little thing. I made up my mind that if I ever left the Army as well as from the war I was never ever going to damage an additional point in my life, and I made a decision that art was the point that I would certainly do.” An additional male stated to d’Amico, “Art resembles a great night’s sleep. You come away refreshed as well as peaceful.”.
In late October, 1944, an Arts as well as Crafts Branch of Special Solutions Division, Head office, European Cinema of Workflow was established. A versatile program of handcrafts grew amongst the Army profession soldiers.
The increased interest in crafts, as opposed to fine arts, right now cause a brand-new name for the program: The “Handicrafts Branch.”.
In 1945, the War Division released a brand-new guidebook, “Soldier Handicrafts”, to assist implement this brand-new focus. The guidebook included instructions for establishing crafts centers, selecting as well as improvisating tools and tools, and also basic details on a selection of arts as well as crafts.
As the Army removaled from a combat to a peacetime duty, most of crafts stores in the USA were outfitted with woodworking power machinery for construction of home furnishings and also things for individual living. Based on this new pattern, in 1946 the program was once more relabelled, this time around as “Manual Arts.”.
At the very same time, abroad programs were now utilizing regional artists as well as craftsmen to run the crafts centers and also advise in a range of arts and also crafts. These very experienced, native trainers assisted to boost the soldiers’ rate of interest in the respective indigenous societies and also artefacts. Hundreds of soldiers overseas were motivated to tape their experiences on film. These photographs gave a vital methods of communication between soldiers and their households back residence.
When the war ended, the Navy had a company of engineers and draftsmen on contract to create ships. Considering that there was no much longer a demand for even more ships, they were offered a brand-new project: To create a series of educational guides for arts and crafts. These were called “Leisure activity Manuals.” The Army was impressed with the high quality of the Navy manuals as well as had them reprinted and also adopted for usage by Army troops. By 1948, the arts and also crafts practiced throughout the Military were so diverse as well as varied that the program was relabelled “Hobby Shops.” The initial “Interservice Digital photography Contest” was held in 1948. Each solution is qualified to send out 2 years of their winning entries forward for the bi-annual interservice competition. In 1949, the first All Army Crafts Contest was also held. Again, it was clear that the program title, “Pastime Shops” was deceptive as well as overlapped right into various other types of recreation.
In January, 1951, the program was designated as “The Army Crafts Program.” The program was identified as an essential Military recreation task together with sports, libraries, service clubs, soldier shows and also soldier songs. In the official statement of goal, specialist leadership was stressed to insure a balanced, progressive timetable of arts as well as crafts would certainly be conducted in well-equipped, appealing centers on all Army setups.
The program was currently defined in regards to a “Fundamental Seven Program” which consisted of: drawing and also paint; porcelains as well as sculpture; metal work; leathercrafts; version building; digital photography and woodworking. These programs were to be conducted consistently in facilities referred to as the “multiple-type crafts store.” For functional factors, these centers were split into three separate technical areas for woodworking, digital photography and also the arts as well as crafts.
During the Korean Problem, the Army Crafts program made use of the workers and also shops in Japan to educate soldiers to advise crafts in Korea.
The mid-1950s saw more soldiers with automobiles and also the have to fix their automobiles was identified at Ft Carson, Colorado, by the craft supervisor. Soldiers aware of crafts stores knew that they had devices and also so automobile crafts were developed. By 1958, the Engineers published an Authorities Design Guide on Crafts Shops and also Car Crafts Shops. In 1959, the first All Army Art Contest was held. Once again, the Army Crafts Program reacted to the demands of soldiers.
In the 1960’s, the battle in Vietnam was a new difficulty for the Military Crafts Program. The program had 3 levels of assistance; taken care of facilities, mobile trailers created as mobile image labs, and when again a “Package Program.” The set program came from at Head office, Division of Military, and also it confirmed to be popular with soldiers.
Tom Turner, today a well-known studio potter, was a soldier at Ft. Jackson, South Carolina in the 1960s. In the December 1990/ January 1991 “American Crafts” publication, Turner, that had been a graduate student in art school when he was drafted, claimed the program was “a blessing.”.
The Military Musician Program was re-initiated in collaboration with the Workplace of Military Background to document the battle in Vietnam. Soldier-artists were determined as well as teams were formed to draw and also paint the events of this fight. Exhibitions of these soldier-artist jobs were generated as well as explored throughout the UNITED STATE.
In 1970, the initial name of the program, “Arts and also Crafts”, was restored. In 1971, the “Arts and also Crafts/Skills Development Program” was developed for budget plan discussions and also building jobs.
After the Vietnam demobilization, a new focus was put on solution to families and also youngsters of soldiers. To satisfy this new obstacle in an atmosphere of funding restrictions the arts as well as crafts program started charging costs for classes. Much more part-time employees were used to instruct formal classes. Furthermore, a demand for more technical-vocational skills training for armed forces workers was fulfilled by close sychronisation with Army Education Programs. Military arts as well as crafts directors collaborated with soldiers during “Task Transition” to establish soldier skills for brand-new careers in the general public field.
The primary challenge in the 1980s as well as 90s was, and also is, to end up being “self-sufficient.” Supervisors have actually been compelled to locate more ways to produce raised profits to assist settle the loss of appropriated funds and to cover the non-appropriated funds expenses of the program. Programs have included and increased emphasis on solutions such as, picture framing, gallery sales, inscribing and also prize sales, etc. New programs such as multi-media computer graphics appeal to clients of the 1990’s.
The Gulf War presented the Army with some familiar challenges such as employees off responsibility time in hosting locations. Division of Army volunteer noncombatant recreation specialists were sent out to Saudi Arabia in January, 1991, to arrange recreation programs. Arts and also crafts products were sent to the movie theater. An Army Humor Cartoon Contest was carried out for the soldiers in the Gulf, and also arts and crafts programs were established up to satisfy soldier interests.
The enhanced operations tempo of the ’90’s Army has actually when again put emphasis on meeting the “recreation demands of deployed soldiers.” Arts and also crafts activities as well as a range of programs are assets leaders must have to satisfy the implementation challenges of these really different scenarios.
The Military arts and crafts program, whatever it has actually been labelled, has made some unique contributions for the army and our culture in general. Military arts and also crafts does not fit the slim interpretation of drawing and painting or making ceramics, yet the much larger sense of arts and crafts. It is painting as well as drawing. It also inclusives:.
* all types of style. (material, clothing, household appliances, meals, vases, residences, vehicles, landscapes, computers, photocopier, workdesks, commercial equipments, weapon systems, air crafts, roadways, and so on.).
* used technology (digital photography, graphics, woodworking, sculpture, metal smithing, weaving as well as textiles, embroidery, advertising, enameling, stained glass, pottery, graphes, charts, aesthetic aides or even layouts for document …).
* a method of making discovering enjoyable, practical and meaningful (via the procedure of making and also making an item the designer need to choose which materials as well as strategies to utilize, consequently taking part in imaginative trouble resolving as well as discovery) abilities taught have military applications.
* a method to get top quality things as well as save money by doing-it-yourself (making furnishings, presents, fixing points …).
* a means to seek college credit scores, with on article courses.
* an universal and non-verbal language (a photo is worth a thousand words).
* food for the human psyche, an element of morale that permits private expression (freedom).
* the party of human spirit and also quality (our highest possible type of public acknowledgment is with a specialized monolith).
* physical and mental therapy (electric motor skill advancement, stress and anxiety reduction, and so on.).
* a task that promotes self-reliance and also self-worth.
* the record of the human race, and in this situation, of the Army.
Just what would the globe resemble today if this usually unknown program had not existed? To quantitatively specify the general impact of this program on the globe is impossible. Numerous soldier citizens have actually been directly as well as indirectly subjected to arts and also crafts since this program existed. One activity, digital photography can supply an idea to its impact. Soldiers motivated to take pictures, starting with WW II, have actually shared those pictures with friends and family. Classes in “Exactly how to Use a Camera” to “How you can Develop Film and Publish Images” were critical in soldiers seeing the outcomes of using high quality equipment. A good camera and also lens could make a huge distinction in the quality of the print. They bought the top of the line devices. When they were released from the Army or house on leave this brand-new tools was showed to the family members and buddies. Without this motivation and direct exposure to photography several would not have actually recorded their individual experiences or recognized the difference top quality tools might make. Friends and families would not have had the chance to “see” the environment their soldier was residing in without these images. Germany, Italy, Korea, Japan, Panama, and so on. were away positions that most had actually not seen.
As the twenty first century approaches, the predictions for an arts renaissance by Megatrends 2000 seem reasonable based on the Army Arts and Crafts Program practical experience. In the April ’95 issue of “American Demographics” magazine, a post titled “Generation X” totally supports that this is undoubtedly the instance today. Television and computers have actually significantly added to “Generation X” being extra curious about the visual arts and also crafts.
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” > www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR< a href=" http://www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR" rel=" nofollow" > www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR< a href=" http://www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR" rel=" nofollow" > www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR The Lighthouse at Hartlepool Cliff< img alt=" debt application "src=" https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7112/7005429853_f1c75c6c35.jpg" width=" 400"/ > Photo by< a href=" http://www.flickr.com/photos/47908901@N03/7005429853" > Gallery of Hartlepool This is a photo of the lighthouse at Hartlepool Headland taken in 1920. The lighthouse was developed on a pier called Pilots Peir. Picture Collection No:2007.10.3. Photos from Hartlepool

Cultural Solutions that belong to The Commons on Flickr are identified’ no known copyright limitations ‘suggesting that Hartlepool Cultural Providers is not aware of any present copyright constraints on these photos either due to the fact that the copyright is forgoed or the regard to copyright has actually ended. Industrial use of pictures is not allowed. Applications for industrial usage or for higher high quality recreations must be made to Hartlepool Cultural Services, Sir William Gray Home, Clarence Roadway, Hartlepool, TS24 8BT. When making use of the photos please debt’ Hartlepool Cultural Services’. Alarm

Image by< a href=" http://www.flickr.com/photos/47908901@N03/5633910355" > Gallery of Hartlepool Alarm clock with a piece of German shellinstalled in the dial. The clock was harmed during the bombardment of the Hartlepools on 16th December 1914. It is said that the clock stopped at the time of the shell striking it. The clock came from a homeowner at 14 Collingwood Roadway yet is now component of the collections at the Gallery of Hartlepool and also is on permanent screen. Actually the clock was manufactured in Germany. HAPMG: 1990.6.1. Pictures from Hartlepool Cultural Services that are component of The Commons on Flickr are identified ‘no known copyright limitations
‘ suggesting that Hartlepool Cultural Solutions is not aware of any type of current copyright constraints on these pictures either since the copyright is forgoed or the term of copyright has ended. Business usage of images is not allowed. Applications for commercial use or for better reproductions must be made to Hartlepool Cultural Services, Sir William Gray House, Clarence Road, Hartlepool, TS24 8BT. When utilizing the photos please credit scores’ Hartlepool Cultural Services’.