Browsed by
Month: June 2017

What Is Residence Equity And also Why Should You Treatment?

What Is Residence Equity And also Why Should You Treatment?

home equity
by gnuckx You could have heard a whole lot about
the house equity lending from good friends or co-workers, but still you are not sure what it is as well as exactly how it works. But really, exactly what is a residence equity financing? To understand what it is and just how it works, initially we need to know exactly what residence equity is. To be able for you to have residence equity, naturally, you need to have or own a residence. Your house can be your best property as well as regardless of just how much loan you are making currently, the time will come when you need a substantial amount of loan- not simply a little additional- yet a large amount of money. And also don’t claim that that’s not mosting likely to take place, because we have no idea exactly what the future has in store for us.Home equity is the distinction in between the existing market worth (assessed worth )of your house and also the superior home loan equilibrium. For that reason, if-Your home’s assessed worth is$100, 000 Your superior home loan balance is $50, 000 Your home equity is $ 50,000 Now that you know just what home equity is, it’s time for you to ask “what is a house equity finance”? A house equity financing has two major kinds; the home equity financing and house equity credit line. A house equity finance or a residence equity line of credit rating allows you to obtain loan using your house’s equity as security. Both types in fact put your home in the hands of the lending institutions. If you are not able to pay your fees, this could mean the loss of your residence. So, be very careful in dealing with this kind of loan.To compute for your potential credit scores, the majority of lending institutions established a portion of your residence’s evaluated worth minus the equilibrium owed on mortgage.

The precise quantity in which you could obtain also relies on some variables like your capability to pay, financial debts, as well as other economic responsibility. Given the above example: Your residence’s appraised value $100, 000 Percent x 80%Percentage of assessed worth= $80, 000 Less equilibrium owed on mortgage -$50, 000 Your possible credit history is$30, 000 Since you understand exactly what house equity
as well as a house equity loan are, the following thing you should be asking is, which home equity loan is best for you? To discover which residence equity car loan is best for you, figure out
the objective of your financing as well as how much time you wish to pay it, in terms of years. In order for you not to obtain hooked-up on debt for a long period of time, borrow just the quantity you require for a particular purpose only. For more totally free short articles like this one, or as much as date information as well as details on Australian home equity car loans and also UNITED STATE house equity fundings, check out: http://www.best-home-equity-loans.com.au

Basic Automotive Insurance Coverage Explained

Basic Automotive Insurance Coverage Explained

While everyone that drives in this country has to have some form of auto insurance by law, many do not understand the basics of their policies. While we don’t all have to be auto insurance experts, it is important to at least comprehend the major bricks that build our auto insurance policies.

Collision Coverage.
This covers loss to your own auto caused by its collision with another vehicle or object. If you cause an accident, collision coverage will pay to repair your vehicle, and is normally the most expensive part of an auto insurance policy. You must choose a deductible, which is the amount you, the insured, must pay before the insurance company pays the remainder of each covered loss. The higher the deductible, the lower the premium costs. However, keep in mind that this is the amount you must pay (generally to the repair shop) if your vehicle is damaged, so deciding on your deductible, which directly affects your premium, can be a bit of a balancing act.

Comprehensive Coverage.
This covers damage to your vehicle caused by an event other than a collision or overturn. Examples include fire, theft, vandalism, and falling objects. This also comes with a deductible you select, which is how much you will pay before the insurance company pays the remainder.

Liability.
The official definition of liability from the InsWeb glossary is: “That portion of the insurance contract which pays and renders service on behalf of an insured for a covered loss arising out of the insured’s responsibility to others imposed by law or assumed by contract.” In simpler terms, if you are at fault in an accident, liability insurance will pay to cover injuries and property damage costs caused to others in the accident (including your legal defense costs, if applicable). Bodily injury coverage pays for things like medical costs and lost salary to others; while property damage pays for repairs to other people’s property you damaged in the accident (other than your own car). Liability coverage (which is the state mandated part of your policy) is the basic building block of any auto policy, and minimum liability limits vary from state to state.

Below are some common extra coverage items that are available to you:

Medical Payments

This pays you and your passengers for medical and funeral expenses incurred in an auto accident, regardless of fault. It will also cover injuries sustained by you while you’re operating someone else’s car (with their permission), in addition to injuries you or your family members incur when you are pedestrians.

Personal Injury Protection

This is the name usually given to no-fault benefits in states that have enacted mandatory or optional no-fault auto insurance laws. Personal Injury Protection (PIP) usually includes benefits for medical expenses, loss of income from work, essential services, accidental death, funeral expenses, and survivor benefits.

No-Fault Insurance

Many states have enacted auto accident compensation laws permitting auto accident victims to collect directly from their own insurance companies for medical and hospital expenses regardless of who was at fault in the accident. Although there are many legal variations of no-fault insurance, most states still allow people to sue the negligent party if the amount of damages exceeds a certain state-determined threshold.

Uninsured/Underinsured Motorists Coverage:

Uninsured Motorists Bodily Injury

Uninsured Motorists Bodily Injury (UMBI) covers you for all sums (up to your policy limits) if an accident occurs with an uninsured or hit-and-run motorist who is determined to be legally at fault.

Underinsured Motorists Bodily Injury

Underinsured Motorist Bodily Injury covers you for all sums (up to your policy limits) if an accident occurs with a motorist who is underinsured (i.e., they carry bodily injury limits less than your UMBI limits and less than the amount of the injuries).

Uninsured Motorists Property Damage

Uninsured Motorist Property Damage (UMPD) Liability coverage pays for property damages caused by uninsured drivers.

There are also other extra items, such as rental reimbursement and towing and labor charges in case of a breakdown. As mentioned above, please visit the Insweb Auto Insurance Glossary for further definitions.

Remember to keep yourself adequately covered; while having the bare minimums required by each state may keep you in compliance with state laws, they may not be enough to protect your assets if you have a major incident. Insurance experts recommend that you review your insurance policy often and thoroughly.

For more information on how to get cheap car insurance from top carriers like Geico, Progressive and more get your free quotes at https://freemovinghelp.org/app/auto-ins.html. Once you have gotten about 3-5 quotes, write them down.

Then, you can start calling different auto insurance companies and tell them what the competition has quoted you. This can be a great way to get a cheaper auto insurance rate.

*PS. the number in the video above has been disconnected as it is a bit old may be being used for something else, wanted to let you all know, the link above using the car insurance tips above should get you fast results.

Not quite as it seems

Not quite as it seems

Check out these car loan images:

Not quite as it seems
car loan
Image by Spicymex rice
Yes it is a Target Travel 709D but it was actually being used by First Devon & Cornwall in this shot, at the time First had numerous vehicles ‘blacklisted’ and were kept off road until defects were corrected so First got a little helping hand from Robert Risk, thus Merc 709Ds N94/95 BNF were loaned to help cover services.

Jensen FF
car loan
Image by mark.braith
Jensen FF, kindly loaned to me by Ricardo (company I work for) for my sisters wedding. Un.Be.Lievable.

(and expensive – it did 6mpg for about 300miles!)

The Advanta Platinum Company Cards Simplifying Business

The Advanta Platinum Company Cards Simplifying Business

Advanta was created in 1951 and there are two main finance companies under Advanta specifically Advanta nationwide Bank and Advanta. Advanta is renowned for imaginative and personalized economic solution it gives to its consumers as well as the skills of their understanding of the monetary business and managerial expertise which it makes use of to its advantage to cement its interactions having its clients.

Advanta provides 2 kinds of Advanta company charge cards and Advanta Platinum company Card is just one such card.

Target Clients

Advanta Platinum Card is especially created remember the businessmen who would like to combine all their company costs onto a single charge card account. These folks need pay every thing about the business through credit cards as well as the same time require a higher personal line of credit.

Key Features

Advanta Platinum Card has no annual fee with an initial 12 thirty days duration 0per cent APR i.e. 0% interest on expenditures and balance transfers. After the expiration of basic year, the APR for purchases and transfers of balance is reasonable. The card is sold with an exceptionally large line of credit of $ 50,000. The look of card could be tailor-made to accommodate the clients business requirements.

Other Benefits

Advanta Platinum company Card is accepted at millions of places worldwide over. A number of the advantages that Advanta Platinum Business cardholder will enjoy tend to be appealing discounts on services and products from stores and merchants, internet based accessibility account information and services including statements and management reports, tailored inspections and billing day. The web info is compatible with both Quicken and Microsoft cash pc software.

The card provides car local rental insurance coverage and defense of expenditures and warranties. In addition, the Advanta Business card offers automated theft and damage security.

Reward Program

Advanta Platinum Business Card MasterCard holders usually takes advantage of the incentive programs and earn a point for each and every buck purchase fashioned with the card. There is absolutely no upper limitation for things which can be gathered in a year. These things could be exchanged for travel benefits or appealing money rebates.

Businessmen which periodically carry a balance and plan to use the extra advantages and services (especially the retailer and business discounts) may benefit many from utilizing the Advanta Platinum Business Card MasterCard. The rate nonetheless is just a little higher versus that charged to a person with great credit, however it is reasonable if you never always carry a balance on their account.

Visit Credit-Wisdom.com Unraveling the greatest in Credit Cards. Just click here for Advanta Company Bank Cards
More information on:“Advanta Platinum Company Card”

Related Platinum Card Articles

Bay Road residence of the creator of the Boundary Watch paper in Mt Gambier.

Bay Road residence of the creator of the Boundary Watch paper in Mt Gambier.

Check out these consumer loan rates images:

Bay Road home of the founder of the Border Watch newspaper in Mt Gambier.
consumer loan rates
Image by denisbin
Brief History of Mt Gambier – the second city of SA after Adelaide (region population nearly 35,000, urban 28,000).
Lieutenant James Grant aboard the Lady Nelson sighted and named Mt Gambier in 1800 after a Lord of the Admiralty. The first white man to traverse the area was Stephen Henty of Portland in 1839 when he sighted the Blue Lake. He returned with cattle and stockmen in 1841. He later claimed that had he known the lake and volcano he had discovered in 1839 was in SA he would have immediately applied for an 1839 Special Survey. But Henty thought he was squatting on land in NSW and he was not an official SA settler so the government ordered him off the land in 1844. Thus the first official white settler of the South East and the Mt Gambier district became Evelyn Sturt, brother to Captain Charles Sturt, who took up an occupational license in March 1844 and a property he named Compton just north of the present city. In April 1844 Governor Grey and a party of assistants including the Assistant Surveyor General Thomas Burr and artist George French Angas explored the South East naming Robe and doing the first surveys. Evelyn Sturt became the first to have an occupational license to squat and the first purchase freehold land near Mt Gambier which he did in 1847- a section of 77 acres when 80 acres was the norm. He left the district in 1854 selling his freehold land to Hastings Cunningham who in 1855 subdivided some of this land thus creating the town of Gambierton. The town lands were adjacent to the site of the first police station selected near what is now Cave Gardens by the government in 1845. A small bush inn also operated at this spot. The first streets were named after early locals such as Evelyn Sturt, Compton, Ferrers and Crouch (built the first general store before the town was created) etc. The town grew quickly because of the mild climate, fertile soils, plentiful water and the influx of settlers from across the border in what was to become the colony of Victoria. Cunningham himself was a great benefactor and donated land for the first school in 1856. In 1861 the town name was changed by act of parliament to Mt Gambier. The Hundred of Mt Gambier (along with three other hundreds) was declared in 1858 and began the closer settlement of the South East.

Unlike other areas of SA the South East was seen as paradise for pastoralists and the optimistic pastoralists flocked to the area with their flocks in 1845. The large runs locked up the land and prevented farmers from settling in the region except for the fertile lands around Mount Gambier. Here small scale farmers had small properties and grew potatoes, hops, and later had dairy cows as well as growing wheat and oats. Land acts in the early 1870s designed to break up the big runs only partially succeeded in the South East where most station owners bought up their lands freehold. It was after 1905 before the big pastoral estates were really broken up for farmers and closer settlement, except for near Mt Gambier. Apart from Evelyn Sturt the other early white settlers of the South East in 1845 were Alexander Cameron at Penola, John Robertson at Struan, William Macintosh and George Ormerod at Naracoorte, the Austin brothers at Yallum Park (later John Riddoch), the Arthur brothers (nephews of Governor Arthur of Van Diemen’s Land) at Mt Schanck( now Mt Schank) and the Leake brothers at Glencoe. In fact in 1845 nineteen leasehold runs were taken up in the South East with a further thirty runs in 1846 and most had several 80 acres sections of freehold land near the main homestead. Most had got to the South East from Casterton and Portland in Victoria as the swamps near the coast were too difficult to traverse except for the country near Robe. Many of the estates were huge. Evelyn Sturt on the Compton/Mt Gambier run had 85 square miles as well as his freehold land; Robertson had 135 square miles at Struan; George Glen (and William Vansittart) of Mayurra had 110 square miles; the SA Company had 159 square miles on the Benara run; the Leake brothers had 194 square miles on Glencoe; Hunter had 56 square miles on Kalangadoo; Neil Black of Noorat Victoria had 45 square miles on Kongorong run and 101 square miles at Port MacDonnell and the Arthur brothers had a huge run at Mt Schanck. By 1851 almost 5,000 square miles of the South East was occupied by Occupational License and most licenses were converted to 14 year leases in that year. A third of all leasehold land in SA was taken up in the South East because of its higher rainfall and suitability for pastoralism and a third of all sheep in the colony were in the South East. When Hundreds were declared in the South East in the late 1850s and early 1860s pastoralists bought up the land. In one case John Riddoch of Yallum Park owned the entire Hundred of Monbulla. Another pastoralist W. Clarke who had purchased Mt Schancke station from the Arthur brothers in 1861 owned SA land valued at £1.25 million when he died in 1874 and he had 120,000 acres freehold in Victoria, 75,000 acres freehold in SA( Mt Schank) and 50,000 acres freehold in each of NSW and Tasmania! Mt Schanck was changed in Schank in 1917 when German place names in SA were changed as Schank without the second “c” is an old English name!

In the 1850s Mt Gambier was a shanty village as the South East was a region of large pastoral estates and little agricultural farming and very low population numbers. It was far from Adelaide and remote and it was only after the Princeland episode in 1862 with the threat of possible secession to a new state that the Adelaide government began to invest in the South East and really encourage settlement there. The Border Watch newspaper was established in 1861, the Mt Gambier Hotel opened in 1862 and the Mt Gambier Council was formed in 1863.By the early 1860s Mt Gambier had almost 1,000 residents making it one of the largest towns in SA after the copper mining centres of Burra, Kadina and Moonta. By the 1881 SA census Mt Gambier had 2,500 residents making it the biggest town outside of Adelaide. In 1865 four iconic historic buildings were erected-the Courthouse, the Gaol, Christ Church Anglican and the Post Office and Telegraph Station. The flourmill which later became the Oat Mill opened in 1867 as wheat farmers had now taken up lands around the Mount. Mt Gambier was growing into a fine prosperous looking town with churches, stores, banks, hotels and fine residences. In the 1870s the rural population increased dramatically with tenant potato farmers on Browne’s Moorak estate and intensive hop growing in several localities such as Yahl and OB Flat and Glenburnie etc. Also in 1876 the first commercial forestry was started at the behest of George Goyder. A tree nursery was established on the edge of Leg of Mutton Lake in 1876 on a site selected by George Goyder himself. A stone cottage for the first nurseryman Charles Beale was constructed and it survived until demolished in 1969 but the nursery closed in 1929. The nursery propagated eucalypts, Oak, Elm, Ash, Sycamore, and North American pines. Pinus radiata was first grown at Leg of Mutton Lake and was being dispersed to other areas by 1878. Pinus canariensis was also grown in the 1880s. Pinus radiata is now the most commonly grown commercial forest tree in SA and Australia. Also in the 1870s the first hospital was erected and Dr Wehl, the town’s doctor for many years was in residence.

In the mid 1880s the first rail line was laid as the railway lines pushed out from Mt Gambier to Naracoorte. The service to Naracoorte began in 1887 and connected on with the line to Bordertown and Adelaide. By 1897 a railway connected Mt Gambier to Millicent and the port at Beachport. The railway line across the border to Heywood and Melbourne was not completed until 1917 as the SA government resisted a line that would take goods and passengers from Mt Gambier to Port Melbourne rather than to Port Adelaide. Mt Gambier railway station used to be a hive of activity with daily trains to Adelaide and an overnight sleeper services several times a week. Passenger trains to Mt Gambier from Adelaide stopped in 1990 after Australian National took over the SA railway network. Freight services stopped in 1995 and the railway line and station was formally closed. The railyards and other buildings were cleared in 2013.

The Buandik Aboriginal People.
The Buandik people are commemorated in a city street but by little else. Yet they were resilient and determined fighters opposed to the white settlement of the South East. Their occupation of the Mt Gambier district stretches back to around 20,000+ years but their dated occupation from archaeological sites goes back to about 11,000 years with their myths and legends including stories about volcanic activity at Mt Gambier. The last volcanic explosions were about 4,000 years ago. Both Mt Schank and Mt Gambier were important places to the Buandik for ceremonies, hunting, access to water and stone implement making. A government report in 1867 noted that the Buandik people in government care were few in number mainly sickly and elderly. The younger people had presumably moved out into the white community. But back in the 1840s the Buandik were a force to be reckoned with. There are no common stories of Aboriginal massacres but white pastoralists certainly retaliated when sheep were stolen. On Mt Schank station the Buandik were so troublesome that shepherds would not venture out to care for sheep alone and the Arthur brothers gave this trouble as their reason for them selling the run in 1845. In 1845 the government established a police station at Mt Gambier, which the Protector of Aboriginals visited, to ensure that pastoralists did not massacre the Buandik.

William Vansittart and Vansittart Park.
Vansittart Park has been a focal point of Mt Gambier since 1884 for activities such as family picnics, political rallies and speeches, bike racing, band rotunda concerts, bowling greens, sport oval, grandstand (1927) and Anzac memorial services. But who was William Vansittart? He was an Anglican reverend from England (Vansittart is a noble and political Anglo-Irish family in the UK) who arrived in SA in 1847 as a young bachelor. He was never licensed as a minister in SA but he developed his passions for making money and horse racing here. He mixed with the elite of Adelaide like Sir Samuel Davenport, the Governor and was a friend of Hurtle Fisher and he was Master of the Hounds. In 1850 he purchased 35 acres at Beaumont where he built Tower House and 80 acres at Mt Gambier. He imported a thoroughbred horse from Hobart called Lucifer. Ironic that a minister of religion would have a horse called Lucifer! His horses raced in Adelaide, Salisbury, Gawler, Brighton and Clare as well as in Mt Gambier and Penola. In 1851 he also took over the 110 square mile 14 year lease of Mayurra run with George Glen of Millicent. In 1852 he returned to England for a short time and on his return he purchased more freehold land bringing his estate to around 800 acres. Not long after in 1854 his horse shied, he was thrown against a tree and died of head injuries but he died intestate with an estate worth over £10,000. Glen bought out his share of Mayurra; the Beaumont house and property was sold in 1867 as were his race horses and his brother Captain Spencer Vansittart eventually inherited the Mt Gambier property. In accordance with William’s wishes 115 acres were set aside to provide income for a scholarship for boarders at St Peters Boys College which happened from 1859. Later in 1883 Spencer Vansittart offered 20 acres to the Mt Gambier Council for a memorial park at the “nominal” sum of £400 which hardly seems “nominal”. The Council raised a loan and purchased the land and the park is still enjoyed by the city’s residents and visitors. Captain Spencer’s widow sold the last package of 300 acres of land in 1912 thus ending the Vansittart links with Mt Gambier. The Vansittart scholarship is still available for boarders from the South East and is operated by a group of College trustees.

Some Historic Buildings in Mt Gambier and a town walk.
Your town walk is basically straight ahead along Penola Road towards the Mount itself which becomes Bay Road( the bay is at Port MacDonnell) once you cross Commercial Street which is the Main Street. There are just a few diversions to the left as you face the Mount. The coach will collect you at the Mount end of the walk near the Old Courthouse.

If you a good walker check out the fine houses in Jardine Street at numbers 1, 7, 9, 11, 12, 17 and 22. They range from cottages to Gothic and turreted mansions including the home of Jens the hotelier. This detour will add another 10 minutes to the walk if you elect to do it.

1.Catholic Covent. Sisters of Mercy setup a convent school in 1880. This wonderful convent was not built until 1908 in local dolomite stone & limestone quoins. Note the fine stone gables with small niches for statuary, the well proportioned arched colonnades and upstairs oriel windows – the projecting bay windows with stone supports. This is one of the finest buildings in Mt Gambier. The convent closed in 1986. Now Auspine.

2.Wesleyan Methodist Church Hall/Sunday School. Across the street is pink dolomite neo-classical style Wesleyan Methodist Sunday School Hall. Hundreds of children attended Sunday School in those days. It opened in 1904. It is now commercial offices. (If you want to walk up Wyatt Street beside the Sunday School and turn right at second street which is at Gray you will see the old two storey Methodist Manse at 101 Gray St. It was built in 1868 and sold 1941. As you turn into Gray Street the Salvation Army Hall is on your left. Allow 10 minutes for this detour before returning to Penola Road).

3.Methodist Church now Liberty Church. A Gothic large church built in 1862 by the Wesleyans. Opened by minister from Portland. Additions made 1877 with new entrance. The old lecture hall and Sunday School was beneath the church. Note the buttress on corners and sides. Became Uniting Church 1977 and closed 1994 when services moved to St Andrews Presbyterian Church. Behind the church (walk through the car park) in Colhurst Place is LLandovery two storey mansion now a B&B. Built 1878 for a flour and oat miller who had his mill in Percy Street.

4.St Paul’s Catholic Church. This impressive Gothic church with huge tower with crenulations was opened in 1884 and will be open today. There are 1966 extensions to the rear of it. The Presbytery is behind the church facing Alexander St. it was built in 1901 when the church was free of building debt. The first thatched bush church was built in another location in 1855. From 1857 the priest was Father Julian Tenison Woods, explorer, academic, horseman etc. A second church opened in 1861 in Sturt St and is now demolished. It closed in 1885 as this church opened. The bells came from Dublin. The church fence and gates built 1936.

5.The Mount Gambier Club. Across the street is the Club. It was built in 1904 for a local distiller as chambers for lease. The wealthy pastoralists of the South East formed an exclusive men only club in 1913 and it has used the upper floor of Engelbrecht’s chambers ever since. They purchased the whole building in 1920. The Club is a beautifully proportioned classical style building with pediments, balustrades, window entablature, and perfect symmetry. Look down the sides and you can see it is made of Mt Gambier limestone blocks.

6.Mt Gambier Caledonian Hall. Next door is the Scots Club. Its prominence signifies the Scottish links of many Gambier residents. The hall was opened in 1914 and opened by the former Prime Minister Sir George Reid, another Scot. It has classical features but is rather ugly and neglected these days. It is now a night club.

7.The Trustees Building. Next to the Caledonian is the Trustee Building erected in 1958. Its blue and bone tiled façade is typical of 1950s architecture yet the rectangular appearance has a slight classical look about it. It is on the SA Heritage Register. Accountants now occupy it.

8.Turn left into Percy Street and go along here beyond KFC for one town block to the next corner for the Oatmills (now a coffee shop and cinemas). Milling and brewing were two of Mt Gambier’s prime 19th century industries. The 4 storey complex here was started in 1867 for Welsh Thomas Williams who eventually had five flour mills. His mill was called Commercial Flourmills. A new owner converted the mill from wheat milling to oat milling. A new oatmill was built in 1901 and operated until 1975 producing Scottish porridge oats. The mill has now been restored with café, shops and cinemas. Return to Penola Rd.

9. Mt Gambier Hotel. No hotel could have a more remarkable origin than the Mt Gambier. An African American John Byng built a weatherboard hotel near here in 1847. The third licensee Alexander Mitchell, another Scot, took it over and moved the hotel to this corner site in 1862 as an impressive two storey hotel which was unusual at that time. The western wing was added in 1883 and balconies affixed in 1902.

10.Cross towards the Mount with the traffic lights then turn left into Commercial Street East.

11.Mt Gambier Town Hall. Marked as the Riddoch Gallery this fine Venetian Gothic style building is impressive with its coloured stone work contrasting well with cement rendered horizontal lines and vertical panels around windows and doors. The upper windows are mullioned with stone divisions between the glass. It was built in 1882 with the clock tower added in 1883 after a donation. The first Council meeting was in 1863 with Dr Wehl as chairman held in a hotel. Later the Council hired a room at the Foresters Hall and then they purchased this site in 1868 with a weatherboard room. This was used until 1882.

12.Mt Gambier old Institute. The Literary Institute was formed in 1862 and a foundation stone laid for a reading room/hall in 1868 by John Riddoch. The single storey institute opened in 1869. The upper floor was added in 1887, so that it would match the new Town Hall. It is built in a similar style- Venetian Romanesque as the windows and rounded and not arched as with a gothic structure.

13.Captain Gardiner Memorial Fountain 1884. The fountain was presented by Captain Robert Gardiner the grandfather of Sir Robert Helpman (his name was originally Helpmann). The fountain was made in Melbourne .Gardiner was also a benefactor of St Andrew’s Presbyterian -he donated the pipe organ in 1885.

14.Jens Hotel. After demolishing an earlier hotel (the 1847 hotel of John Byng) Johannes Jens had the first section of his Jens Hotel built on this corner in 1884. An almost identical eastern wing was erected in 1904 and the Spanish Art Deco section in 1927. Turn right here and go behind the Town hall to the Cave Gardens.

15.Cave Gardens. This spot was an early water supply. A garden was created in 1893 and then improved and reconstructed in 1925. This sink hole has recently been upgraded again and it is lit at night.

16.Post Office. This important communications centre was erected in 1865 as a telegraph office/post office. This is till one of the finest buildings in Mt Gambier and a rare example of the Georgian style for the city. . The single storey side wings were added in 1906 in a sympathetic style. It is still the main city Post Office.

17.Norris Agency Building. This superb Italianate building was completed in 1900 as chambers for businessmen. Owner was Alexander Norris who died in 1917. The façade is pink dolomite with cement quoins and unusual lined decoration work above the windows and door each contained within a triangular classical pediment.

18.Farmers Union Building. Another classical style building built when this style was out of fashion in 1914.Erected for Farmers Union as a large two storey building. It has none of the grace of the Norris building next door. FU was formed in 1888 in Jamestown by Thomas Mitchell, a Scot and others to provide cheap rates for grains, seeds and superphosphate but in the early 1900s they branched into products for dairy farmers and the marketing of milk products. The Mt Gambier district had plenty of dairy farmers. It is now owned by a Japanese company Kirin but it still markets its chocolate milk drinks as Farmers Union. Upper floor has double pilasters (flattened pillars) with top volutes but little other decoration.

19.Savings Bank Building on the corner. The former Savings Bank in Gothic style is unusual for commercial premises in Mt Gambier. It is constructed of weathered local limestone and was built in 1906. Note the different cut stone for the foundations, simulated turrets on the corners and by the door to break the façade appearance and the stone line above the lower window which then divides the façade into equal thirds.

20.Macs Hotel. This hotel was built in 1864 and is largely unchanged except that the upper floor was added in 1881. The first licensee was a Scot named John MacDonald. The double veranda supports are very elegant.

21.Roller flourmill now a painted hardware store. Built 1885 as a steam flourmill in pink dolomite. Note the small 12 paned windows set in much larger indented niches in the walls on the northern wall. (Sturt St.)

22.Christ Church Anglican Church and hall. Dr Browne of Moorak donated half the money for the construction of Christ Church in pink dolomite and with an unusual gabled tower. Church and tower completed in 1866. Adjacent is the Jubilee Hall built in 1915, destroyed by fire in 1951, and rebuilt exactly the same in weathered local limestone blocks with the original foundation stone still in place. It has the single Gothic window in the street facing gable and a crenulated square tower. Adjoining it is the 1869 Sunday School with the narrow double pointed Gothic windows. It was extended in 1892. The lychgate is more recent as a memorial to a regular church goer, Margaret French who died in 1927.

23.The old railway station just visible along the rail lines to your right. The first rail line was to Beachport in 1879 and the second to Naracoorte (and so to Adelaide) in 1887. Portland and Melbourne line opened 1917. A spur line to Glencoe was completed in 1904. First station was erected in 1879. It was demolished for the erection of the current station in 1918 which is similar in design to those in Tailem Bend, Bordertown, Moonta etc. Bluebird rail cars started on the Mt Gambier run in 1953 when the old 3’6” gauge line to Wolseley was converted to 5’3”. The last passenger service to Adelaide finished in 1990 and the station closed for freight in 1995. The railyards were cleared in 2013 and the future of the station is bleak. The rail lines to Beachport and Glencoe closed in 1956/57.

24.The Old Courthouse, 42 Bay Rd. It has a great low wall suitable for sitting on. This well designed Georgian style Courthouse opened in 1865 and the similarly styled side wings were added in 1877. The front veranda, which is not Georgian in style, was added in 1880. In 1975 the Courthouse was granted to the National Trust for a museum. The adjoining new Courthouse opened in 1975 at the same time. Note the “blind” windows to the façade but the same rounded Georgian shaped, 16 paned windows on the sides.

The Blue Lake, Mt Schank and Volcanoes.
The jewel in the crown of Mt Gambier is undoubtedly the volcanic cone, the crater lakes especially the Blue Lake and the surrounding Botanic Gardens and parklands. The Botanic Garden on the north side was approved in 1872 but nothing happened about plantings and care until 1882. The first pleasure road through the saddle between the Blue Lake and the Valley Lake was created in the 1861 as a more direct road to the then newly created international port named Port MacDonnell. That is why the road is called the Bay road. Surveyor General George Goyder explored the lake surrounds himself in 1876 when he selected the site for the government tree nursery. Later the government established the first sawmill on the edge of the crater reserve near Moorak homestead in the early 1920s. The Centenary Tower was initiated in 1900 to celebrate the centenary of Captain Grant sighting Mt Gambier. It took several years to complete and was opened by the Chief Justice of SA Sir Samuel Way in 1907 but it was completed in 1904. The whole complex is a maar geomorphological formation which originated during a volcanic era about 28,000 years ago but in a second phase of volcanic activity 4,000 to 6,000 years ago the cones and lakes of Mt Gambier were created along with the cones of Mt Schank and Mt Burr near Millicent. Mt Gambier was the most recent volcanic explosion in Australia. The crater lakes are: Blue Lake, Valley Lake, Leg of Mutton Lake and Browne’s Lake (dry). The Blue Lake is linked to the aquifers beneath the deep layers of limestone which underlay the entire South East. Blue Lake is about 72 metres deep and some of the water in it is estimated to be about 500 years old but it is mixed with rain runoff each year as well. The Lake provides the water supply for Mt Gambier. Deep in the lake are examples of the oldest living organisms on earth- stromatalites. The lake changes colour from grey to vivid blue each November and reverts in the following April. The change in colour is related to the position of the sun and reflected light from suspended particles in the lake which reflect blue green light rather than brown grey light. Secondly the suspended matter only occurs because the water near the surface rises in temperature in the spring and it is this which causes the particles to precipitate out of the water. The precipitated matter settles on the bottom of the lake ready for a new cycle the following spring. Like the Blue Lake various sink holes in the district have linkages to the underlying aquifer through the layers of limestone too and they include Cave Gardens, Umpherstone, Piccaninni Ponds, etc.

Moorak Station and Tenison Woods College.
Moorak station as originally known as Mount Gambier Station established by George Glen in the 1840s. The leasehold was later taken over by David Power who in turn sold it to Fisher and Rochford who in turn sold the estate as freehold to the Scottish Dr William Browne who had established Booborowie run with his brother in 1843 north of Burra. The Browne brothers dissolved their partnership around 1865 and John went to live at Buckland Park and William took up residence at Moorak. William had purchased Moorak Station in 1862 and built the grand Moorak homestead in impressive Georgian style onto a smaller house there. William died in 1894 and the Moorak Estate passed to his son Colonel Percival Browne who was to disappear on the ill-fated voyage of the new steamer the Waratah in 1909 which disappeared during a storm off Durban, South Africa. Also on that voyage was Mrs. Agnes Hay (nee Gosse) of Mt Breckan Victor Harbor and Linden Park Estate Adelaide and some 200 other poor souls. Around 1909 the Moorak Station was subdivided for closer settlement and in the 1920s the Marist Brothers purchased the homestead with a little land for their and monastery and opened the Marist Brothers Agricultural College for boys in 1931. That college in turn merged with the Mater Christi College in 1972 to become Tenison College. (Mater Christi College had been formed in 1952 by the merger of the St Josephs Convent School (1880) and St Peters Parish School but the primary section of St Peters broke away in 1969 from Mater Christi College and formed a separate St Peters Primary School. This primary school in turn merged with Tenison College in 2001 to form Tenison Woods College!) The College name commemorates the work of Father Julian Tenison Woods who arrived in Mt Gambier in 1857 to work in Penola and Mt Gambier. It was he who encouraged Mary MacKillop to take her vows and establish her Sisters of St Joseph.

Dr Browne’s manager of Moorak Estate in 1868 introduced hops as a viable crop in the South East and large quantities were grown for about 20 years. Other early experimental crops grown included tobacco, cotton and flax. Dr Browne and Moorak were also important in the potato industry. Dr Browne leased around 830 acres to 20 tenants for the express purpose of growing potatoes. He was keen to emulate the British aristocracy although he was a good Scot with being a manorial style landlord with tenant farmers. Potatoes were also grown from the early years at Yahl, OB Flat and Compton near Mt Gambier. The potatoes were carted down to Port MacDonnell and shipped to Adelaide for consumers. As one of the major wool producers of Australia William Browne contributed roughly half of the funds for the erection of Christ Church Anglican in Mt Gambier. The Moorak estate consisted of around 11,000 acres of the most fertile volcanic soil in SA with another 2,000 acres in a nearby property, German Creek near Carpenter’s Rocks. Dr Browne ran Silky Lincolns on Moorak for their wool as Merinos did not fare well on the damp South East pastures. About 2,000 acres was in wheat, about 2,500 acres was tenanted to other farmers and around 4,000 acres were in lucerne, clover, rye and other pasture grasses. William Browne returned to live in England in 1866 so his sons could attend Eton and military training colleges there. He made regular trips to SA about every second year to oversee his many pastoral properties here. When he died in 1894 he left 100,000 acres of freehold land in SA to his children who all resided here as well as leasehold land. He was an extremely wealthy man. Son Percival took control of Moorak. Before Percival’s death Moorak Estate was partly purchased by the SA government in 1904 for closer settlement when they acquired around 1,000 acres. After Percival’s death a further 6,300 acres was acquired for closer settlement and the remainder of the estate was sold to other farmers. The government paid between £10 and £31 per acre for the land. Percival Browne was highly respected in Mt Gambier and a reserve around the Blue Lake is named after him. The fourth of the crater lakes of Mt Gambier is also named Browne’s Lake after the family but it has been dry for decades. In 1900 Colonel Browne planted the ring of English Oaks around what was to become the oval of the Marist Brothers College.

Moorak.
There is a memorial by the station to William Browne as founder of the Coriadale Sheep Stud. The great Moorak woolshed was demolished in 1939. The Union church which opened in 1920 was used by the Methodists and the Anglicans. It is now a private residence. Moorak hall was opened in 1926. New classrooms were added to the Moorak School in 1928 and the first rooms opened in 1913. The cheese factory in Moorak opened in 1913 as a cooperative and was sold to Farmers Union in 1949. They closed the factory in 1979. Most of the cheese produced at Moorak went to the Melbourne market. The first cheese maker at Moorak was trained at Lauterbach’s cheese factory at Woodside. Moorak was one of a circle of settlements around Mt Gambier that had butter/cheese factories. These towns were: Kongorong; Glencoe East; Glencoe West; Suttontown; Glenburnie; Mil Lel; Yahl; OB Flat; Moorak; Mt Schank; and Eight Mile Creek.

Yahl.
In the 1860s this tiny settlement was a tobacco, hop and potato growing district and it persisted with potatoes up until recent times. Today Yahl is little more than a suburban village of Mt Gambier with a Primary school with approx 120 students. The old government school was erected in 1879. It had a Methodist church built in 1880 which operated as a church until 1977 and it had a large butter factory which had opened in 1888. The butter and cheese factory was taken over by the OB Flat cheese factory in 1939 and the two operated in conjunction with each other. The OB Flat cheese factory closed in 1950 and all production moved to Yahl. The factory finally closed in 1971. The township of Yahl also had a General Store and a Salvation Army Hall which was built in 1919.

Sink Holes: Umpherston Gardens and Cave Gardens.
James Umpherston purchased land near Mt Gambier in 1864 which included a large sink hole or collapsed cavern with a lake in the bottom. He was born in Scotland in 1812 and came to SA in the 1850s with his brother William. William purchased his first land at Yahl in 1859. James Umpherston was a civic minded chap being a local councilor, a parliamentarian in Adelaide for two years and President of the Mt Gambier Agricultural and Horticultural Society for 13 years. When he retired from civic life and farming in 1884 he decided to create a garden in his sinkhole. He beautified it and encouraged visitors and even provided a boat in the lake for boat rides. Access was gained by steps and a path carved into the sinkhole walls. However after he died in 1900 the garden was ignored, became overgrown and was largely forgotten in 1949 when the Woods and Forests Department obtained the land for a new sawmill at Mt Gambier. By then the lake had dried up as the water table had fallen over the decades. In 1976 staff, rather than the government, decided to restore the Umpherstone gardens. The cleared out the rubbish that had been dumped in the sinkhole, restored the path access, trimmed the ivy and replanted the hydrangeas and tree ferns. In 1994 the Woos and Forests Department handed over the land around the sinkhole to the City of Mt Gambier. It was added to the SA Heritage Register in 1995.

Mt Gambier. 1927 additions in Jens Hotel Mt Gambier in Art Nouveau Spanish Mission style
consumer loan rates
Image by denisbin
Brief History of Mt Gambier – the second city of SA after Adelaide (region population nearly 35,000, urban 28,000).
Lieutenant James Grant aboard the Lady Nelson sighted and named Mt Gambier in 1800 after a Lord of the Admiralty. The first white man to traverse the area was Stephen Henty of Portland in 1839 when he sighted the Blue Lake. He returned with cattle and stockmen in 1841. He later claimed that had he known the lake and volcano he had discovered in 1839 was in SA he would have immediately applied for an 1839 Special Survey. But Henty thought he was squatting on land in NSW and he was not an official SA settler so the government ordered him off the land in 1844. Thus the first official white settler of the South East and the Mt Gambier district became Evelyn Sturt, brother to Captain Charles Sturt, who took up an occupational license in March 1844 and a property he named Compton just north of the present city. In April 1844 Governor Grey and a party of assistants including the Assistant Surveyor General Thomas Burr and artist George French Angas explored the South East naming Robe and doing the first surveys. Evelyn Sturt became the first to have an occupational license to squat and the first purchase freehold land near Mt Gambier which he did in 1847- a section of 77 acres when 80 acres was the norm. He left the district in 1854 selling his freehold land to Hastings Cunningham who in 1855 subdivided some of this land thus creating the town of Gambierton. The town lands were adjacent to the site of the first police station selected near what is now Cave Gardens by the government in 1845. A small bush inn also operated at this spot. The first streets were named after early locals such as Evelyn Sturt, Compton, Ferrers and Crouch (built the first general store before the town was created) etc. The town grew quickly because of the mild climate, fertile soils, plentiful water and the influx of settlers from across the border in what was to become the colony of Victoria. Cunningham himself was a great benefactor and donated land for the first school in 1856. In 1861 the town name was changed by act of parliament to Mt Gambier. The Hundred of Mt Gambier (along with three other hundreds) was declared in 1858 and began the closer settlement of the South East.

Unlike other areas of SA the South East was seen as paradise for pastoralists and the optimistic pastoralists flocked to the area with their flocks in 1845. The large runs locked up the land and prevented farmers from settling in the region except for the fertile lands around Mount Gambier. Here small scale farmers had small properties and grew potatoes, hops, and later had dairy cows as well as growing wheat and oats. Land acts in the early 1870s designed to break up the big runs only partially succeeded in the South East where most station owners bought up their lands freehold. It was after 1905 before the big pastoral estates were really broken up for farmers and closer settlement, except for near Mt Gambier. Apart from Evelyn Sturt the other early white settlers of the South East in 1845 were Alexander Cameron at Penola, John Robertson at Struan, William Macintosh and George Ormerod at Naracoorte, the Austin brothers at Yallum Park (later John Riddoch), the Arthur brothers (nephews of Governor Arthur of Van Diemen’s Land) at Mt Schanck( now Mt Schank) and the Leake brothers at Glencoe. In fact in 1845 nineteen leasehold runs were taken up in the South East with a further thirty runs in 1846 and most had several 80 acres sections of freehold land near the main homestead. Most had got to the South East from Casterton and Portland in Victoria as the swamps near the coast were too difficult to traverse except for the country near Robe. Many of the estates were huge. Evelyn Sturt on the Compton/Mt Gambier run had 85 square miles as well as his freehold land; Robertson had 135 square miles at Struan; George Glen (and William Vansittart) of Mayurra had 110 square miles; the SA Company had 159 square miles on the Benara run; the Leake brothers had 194 square miles on Glencoe; Hunter had 56 square miles on Kalangadoo; Neil Black of Noorat Victoria had 45 square miles on Kongorong run and 101 square miles at Port MacDonnell and the Arthur brothers had a huge run at Mt Schanck. By 1851 almost 5,000 square miles of the South East was occupied by Occupational License and most licenses were converted to 14 year leases in that year. A third of all leasehold land in SA was taken up in the South East because of its higher rainfall and suitability for pastoralism and a third of all sheep in the colony were in the South East. When Hundreds were declared in the South East in the late 1850s and early 1860s pastoralists bought up the land. In one case John Riddoch of Yallum Park owned the entire Hundred of Monbulla. Another pastoralist W. Clarke who had purchased Mt Schancke station from the Arthur brothers in 1861 owned SA land valued at £1.25 million when he died in 1874 and he had 120,000 acres freehold in Victoria, 75,000 acres freehold in SA( Mt Schank) and 50,000 acres freehold in each of NSW and Tasmania! Mt Schanck was changed in Schank in 1917 when German place names in SA were changed as Schank without the second “c” is an old English name!

In the 1850s Mt Gambier was a shanty village as the South East was a region of large pastoral estates and little agricultural farming and very low population numbers. It was far from Adelaide and remote and it was only after the Princeland episode in 1862 with the threat of possible secession to a new state that the Adelaide government began to invest in the South East and really encourage settlement there. The Border Watch newspaper was established in 1861, the Mt Gambier Hotel opened in 1862 and the Mt Gambier Council was formed in 1863.By the early 1860s Mt Gambier had almost 1,000 residents making it one of the largest towns in SA after the copper mining centres of Burra, Kadina and Moonta. By the 1881 SA census Mt Gambier had 2,500 residents making it the biggest town outside of Adelaide. In 1865 four iconic historic buildings were erected-the Courthouse, the Gaol, Christ Church Anglican and the Post Office and Telegraph Station. The flourmill which later became the Oat Mill opened in 1867 as wheat farmers had now taken up lands around the Mount. Mt Gambier was growing into a fine prosperous looking town with churches, stores, banks, hotels and fine residences. In the 1870s the rural population increased dramatically with tenant potato farmers on Browne’s Moorak estate and intensive hop growing in several localities such as Yahl and OB Flat and Glenburnie etc. Also in 1876 the first commercial forestry was started at the behest of George Goyder. A tree nursery was established on the edge of Leg of Mutton Lake in 1876 on a site selected by George Goyder himself. A stone cottage for the first nurseryman Charles Beale was constructed and it survived until demolished in 1969 but the nursery closed in 1929. The nursery propagated eucalypts, Oak, Elm, Ash, Sycamore, and North American pines. Pinus radiata was first grown at Leg of Mutton Lake and was being dispersed to other areas by 1878. Pinus canariensis was also grown in the 1880s. Pinus radiata is now the most commonly grown commercial forest tree in SA and Australia. Also in the 1870s the first hospital was erected and Dr Wehl, the town’s doctor for many years was in residence.

In the mid 1880s the first rail line was laid as the railway lines pushed out from Mt Gambier to Naracoorte. The service to Naracoorte began in 1887 and connected on with the line to Bordertown and Adelaide. By 1897 a railway connected Mt Gambier to Millicent and the port at Beachport. The railway line across the border to Heywood and Melbourne was not completed until 1917 as the SA government resisted a line that would take goods and passengers from Mt Gambier to Port Melbourne rather than to Port Adelaide. Mt Gambier railway station used to be a hive of activity with daily trains to Adelaide and an overnight sleeper services several times a week. Passenger trains to Mt Gambier from Adelaide stopped in 1990 after Australian National took over the SA railway network. Freight services stopped in 1995 and the railway line and station was formally closed. The railyards and other buildings were cleared in 2013.

The Buandik Aboriginal People.
The Buandik people are commemorated in a city street but by little else. Yet they were resilient and determined fighters opposed to the white settlement of the South East. Their occupation of the Mt Gambier district stretches back to around 20,000+ years but their dated occupation from archaeological sites goes back to about 11,000 years with their myths and legends including stories about volcanic activity at Mt Gambier. The last volcanic explosions were about 4,000 years ago. Both Mt Schank and Mt Gambier were important places to the Buandik for ceremonies, hunting, access to water and stone implement making. A government report in 1867 noted that the Buandik people in government care were few in number mainly sickly and elderly. The younger people had presumably moved out into the white community. But back in the 1840s the Buandik were a force to be reckoned with. There are no common stories of Aboriginal massacres but white pastoralists certainly retaliated when sheep were stolen. On Mt Schank station the Buandik were so troublesome that shepherds would not venture out to care for sheep alone and the Arthur brothers gave this trouble as their reason for them selling the run in 1845. In 1845 the government established a police station at Mt Gambier, which the Protector of Aboriginals visited, to ensure that pastoralists did not massacre the Buandik.

William Vansittart and Vansittart Park.
Vansittart Park has been a focal point of Mt Gambier since 1884 for activities such as family picnics, political rallies and speeches, bike racing, band rotunda concerts, bowling greens, sport oval, grandstand (1927) and Anzac memorial services. But who was William Vansittart? He was an Anglican reverend from England (Vansittart is a noble and political Anglo-Irish family in the UK) who arrived in SA in 1847 as a young bachelor. He was never licensed as a minister in SA but he developed his passions for making money and horse racing here. He mixed with the elite of Adelaide like Sir Samuel Davenport, the Governor and was a friend of Hurtle Fisher and he was Master of the Hounds. In 1850 he purchased 35 acres at Beaumont where he built Tower House and 80 acres at Mt Gambier. He imported a thoroughbred horse from Hobart called Lucifer. Ironic that a minister of religion would have a horse called Lucifer! His horses raced in Adelaide, Salisbury, Gawler, Brighton and Clare as well as in Mt Gambier and Penola. In 1851 he also took over the 110 square mile 14 year lease of Mayurra run with George Glen of Millicent. In 1852 he returned to England for a short time and on his return he purchased more freehold land bringing his estate to around 800 acres. Not long after in 1854 his horse shied, he was thrown against a tree and died of head injuries but he died intestate with an estate worth over £10,000. Glen bought out his share of Mayurra; the Beaumont house and property was sold in 1867 as were his race horses and his brother Captain Spencer Vansittart eventually inherited the Mt Gambier property. In accordance with William’s wishes 115 acres were set aside to provide income for a scholarship for boarders at St Peters Boys College which happened from 1859. Later in 1883 Spencer Vansittart offered 20 acres to the Mt Gambier Council for a memorial park at the “nominal” sum of £400 which hardly seems “nominal”. The Council raised a loan and purchased the land and the park is still enjoyed by the city’s residents and visitors. Captain Spencer’s widow sold the last package of 300 acres of land in 1912 thus ending the Vansittart links with Mt Gambier. The Vansittart scholarship is still available for boarders from the South East and is operated by a group of College trustees.

Some Historic Buildings in Mt Gambier and a town walk.
Your town walk is basically straight ahead along Penola Road towards the Mount itself which becomes Bay Road( the bay is at Port MacDonnell) once you cross Commercial Street which is the Main Street. There are just a few diversions to the left as you face the Mount. The coach will collect you at the Mount end of the walk near the Old Courthouse.

If you a good walker check out the fine houses in Jardine Street at numbers 1, 7, 9, 11, 12, 17 and 22. They range from cottages to Gothic and turreted mansions including the home of Jens the hotelier. This detour will add another 10 minutes to the walk if you elect to do it.

1.Catholic Covent. Sisters of Mercy setup a convent school in 1880. This wonderful convent was not built until 1908 in local dolomite stone & limestone quoins. Note the fine stone gables with small niches for statuary, the well proportioned arched colonnades and upstairs oriel windows – the projecting bay windows with stone supports. This is one of the finest buildings in Mt Gambier. The convent closed in 1986. Now Auspine.

2.Wesleyan Methodist Church Hall/Sunday School. Across the street is pink dolomite neo-classical style Wesleyan Methodist Sunday School Hall. Hundreds of children attended Sunday School in those days. It opened in 1904. It is now commercial offices. (If you want to walk up Wyatt Street beside the Sunday School and turn right at second street which is at Gray you will see the old two storey Methodist Manse at 101 Gray St. It was built in 1868 and sold 1941. As you turn into Gray Street the Salvation Army Hall is on your left. Allow 10 minutes for this detour before returning to Penola Road).

3.Methodist Church now Liberty Church. A Gothic large church built in 1862 by the Wesleyans. Opened by minister from Portland. Additions made 1877 with new entrance. The old lecture hall and Sunday School was beneath the church. Note the buttress on corners and sides. Became Uniting Church 1977 and closed 1994 when services moved to St Andrews Presbyterian Church. Behind the church (walk through the car park) in Colhurst Place is LLandovery two storey mansion now a B&B. Built 1878 for a flour and oat miller who had his mill in Percy Street.

4.St Paul’s Catholic Church. This impressive Gothic church with huge tower with crenulations was opened in 1884 and will be open today. There are 1966 extensions to the rear of it. The Presbytery is behind the church facing Alexander St. it was built in 1901 when the church was free of building debt. The first thatched bush church was built in another location in 1855. From 1857 the priest was Father Julian Tenison Woods, explorer, academic, horseman etc. A second church opened in 1861 in Sturt St and is now demolished. It closed in 1885 as this church opened. The bells came from Dublin. The church fence and gates built 1936.

5.The Mount Gambier Club. Across the street is the Club. It was built in 1904 for a local distiller as chambers for lease. The wealthy pastoralists of the South East formed an exclusive men only club in 1913 and it has used the upper floor of Engelbrecht’s chambers ever since. They purchased the whole building in 1920. The Club is a beautifully proportioned classical style building with pediments, balustrades, window entablature, and perfect symmetry. Look down the sides and you can see it is made of Mt Gambier limestone blocks.

6.Mt Gambier Caledonian Hall. Next door is the Scots Club. Its prominence signifies the Scottish links of many Gambier residents. The hall was opened in 1914 and opened by the former Prime Minister Sir George Reid, another Scot. It has classical features but is rather ugly and neglected these days. It is now a night club.

7.The Trustees Building. Next to the Caledonian is the Trustee Building erected in 1958. Its blue and bone tiled façade is typical of 1950s architecture yet the rectangular appearance has a slight classical look about it. It is on the SA Heritage Register. Accountants now occupy it.

8.Turn left into Percy Street and go along here beyond KFC for one town block to the next corner for the Oatmills (now a coffee shop and cinemas). Milling and brewing were two of Mt Gambier’s prime 19th century industries. The 4 storey complex here was started in 1867 for Welsh Thomas Williams who eventually had five flour mills. His mill was called Commercial Flourmills. A new owner converted the mill from wheat milling to oat milling. A new oatmill was built in 1901 and operated until 1975 producing Scottish porridge oats. The mill has now been restored with café, shops and cinemas. Return to Penola Rd.

9. Mt Gambier Hotel. No hotel could have a more remarkable origin than the Mt Gambier. An African American John Byng built a weatherboard hotel near here in 1847. The third licensee Alexander Mitchell, another Scot, took it over and moved the hotel to this corner site in 1862 as an impressive two storey hotel which was unusual at that time. The western wing was added in 1883 and balconies affixed in 1902.

10.Cross towards the Mount with the traffic lights then turn left into Commercial Street East.

11.Mt Gambier Town Hall. Marked as the Riddoch Gallery this fine Venetian Gothic style building is impressive with its coloured stone work contrasting well with cement rendered horizontal lines and vertical panels around windows and doors. The upper windows are mullioned with stone divisions between the glass. It was built in 1882 with the clock tower added in 1883 after a donation. The first Council meeting was in 1863 with Dr Wehl as chairman held in a hotel. Later the Council hired a room at the Foresters Hall and then they purchased this site in 1868 with a weatherboard room. This was used until 1882.

12.Mt Gambier old Institute. The Literary Institute was formed in 1862 and a foundation stone laid for a reading room/hall in 1868 by John Riddoch. The single storey institute opened in 1869. The upper floor was added in 1887, so that it would match the new Town Hall. It is built in a similar style- Venetian Romanesque as the windows and rounded and not arched as with a gothic structure.

13.Captain Gardiner Memorial Fountain 1884. The fountain was presented by Captain Robert Gardiner the grandfather of Sir Robert Helpman (his name was originally Helpmann). The fountain was made in Melbourne .Gardiner was also a benefactor of St Andrew’s Presbyterian -he donated the pipe organ in 1885.

14.Jens Hotel. After demolishing an earlier hotel (the 1847 hotel of John Byng) Johannes Jens had the first section of his Jens Hotel built on this corner in 1884. An almost identical eastern wing was erected in 1904 and the Spanish Art Deco section in 1927. Turn right here and go behind the Town hall to the Cave Gardens.

15.Cave Gardens. This spot was an early water supply. A garden was created in 1893 and then improved and reconstructed in 1925. This sink hole has recently been upgraded again and it is lit at night.

16.Post Office. This important communications centre was erected in 1865 as a telegraph office/post office. This is till one of the finest buildings in Mt Gambier and a rare example of the Georgian style for the city. . The single storey side wings were added in 1906 in a sympathetic style. It is still the main city Post Office.

17.Norris Agency Building. This superb Italianate building was completed in 1900 as chambers for businessmen. Owner was Alexander Norris who died in 1917. The façade is pink dolomite with cement quoins and unusual lined decoration work above the windows and door each contained within a triangular classical pediment.

18.Farmers Union Building. Another classical style building built when this style was out of fashion in 1914.Erected for Farmers Union as a large two storey building. It has none of the grace of the Norris building next door. FU was formed in 1888 in Jamestown by Thomas Mitchell, a Scot and others to provide cheap rates for grains, seeds and superphosphate but in the early 1900s they branched into products for dairy farmers and the marketing of milk products. The Mt Gambier district had plenty of dairy farmers. It is now owned by a Japanese company Kirin but it still markets its chocolate milk drinks as Farmers Union. Upper floor has double pilasters (flattened pillars) with top volutes but little other decoration.

19.Savings Bank Building on the corner. The former Savings Bank in Gothic style is unusual for commercial premises in Mt Gambier. It is constructed of weathered local limestone and was built in 1906. Note the different cut stone for the foundations, simulated turrets on the corners and by the door to break the façade appearance and the stone line above the lower window which then divides the façade into equal thirds.

20.Macs Hotel. This hotel was built in 1864 and is largely unchanged except that the upper floor was added in 1881. The first licensee was a Scot named John MacDonald. The double veranda supports are very elegant.

21.Roller flourmill now a painted hardware store. Built 1885 as a steam flourmill in pink dolomite. Note the small 12 paned windows set in much larger indented niches in the walls on the northern wall. (Sturt St.)

22.Christ Church Anglican Church and hall. Dr Browne of Moorak donated half the money for the construction of Christ Church in pink dolomite and with an unusual gabled tower. Church and tower completed in 1866. Adjacent is the Jubilee Hall built in 1915, destroyed by fire in 1951, and rebuilt exactly the same in weathered local limestone blocks with the original foundation stone still in place. It has the single Gothic window in the street facing gable and a crenulated square tower. Adjoining it is the 1869 Sunday School with the narrow double pointed Gothic windows. It was extended in 1892. The lychgate is more recent as a memorial to a regular church goer, Margaret French who died in 1927.

23.The old railway station just visible along the rail lines to your right. The first rail line was to Beachport in 1879 and the second to Naracoorte (and so to Adelaide) in 1887. Portland and Melbourne line opened 1917. A spur line to Glencoe was completed in 1904. First station was erected in 1879. It was demolished for the erection of the current station in 1918 which is similar in design to those in Tailem Bend, Bordertown, Moonta etc. Bluebird rail cars started on the Mt Gambier run in 1953 when the old 3’6” gauge line to Wolseley was converted to 5’3”. The last passenger service to Adelaide finished in 1990 and the station closed for freight in 1995. The railyards were cleared in 2013 and the future of the station is bleak. The rail lines to Beachport and Glencoe closed in 1956/57.

24.The Old Courthouse, 42 Bay Rd. It has a great low wall suitable for sitting on. This well designed Georgian style Courthouse opened in 1865 and the similarly styled side wings were added in 1877. The front veranda, which is not Georgian in style, was added in 1880. In 1975 the Courthouse was granted to the National Trust for a museum. The adjoining new Courthouse opened in 1975 at the same time. Note the “blind” windows to the façade but the same rounded Georgian shaped, 16 paned windows on the sides.

The Blue Lake, Mt Schank and Volcanoes.
The jewel in the crown of Mt Gambier is undoubtedly the volcanic cone, the crater lakes especially the Blue Lake and the surrounding Botanic Gardens and parklands. The Botanic Garden on the north side was approved in 1872 but nothing happened about plantings and care until 1882. The first pleasure road through the saddle between the Blue Lake and the Valley Lake was created in the 1861 as a more direct road to the then newly created international port named Port MacDonnell. That is why the road is called the Bay road. Surveyor General George Goyder explored the lake surrounds himself in 1876 when he selected the site for the government tree nursery. Later the government established the first sawmill on the edge of the crater reserve near Moorak homestead in the early 1920s. The Centenary Tower was initiated in 1900 to celebrate the centenary of Captain Grant sighting Mt Gambier. It took several years to complete and was opened by the Chief Justice of SA Sir Samuel Way in 1907 but it was completed in 1904. The whole complex is a maar geomorphological formation which originated during a volcanic era about 28,000 years ago but in a second phase of volcanic activity 4,000 to 6,000 years ago the cones and lakes of Mt Gambier were created along with the cones of Mt Schank and Mt Burr near Millicent. Mt Gambier was the most recent volcanic explosion in Australia. The crater lakes are: Blue Lake, Valley Lake, Leg of Mutton Lake and Browne’s Lake (dry). The Blue Lake is linked to the aquifers beneath the deep layers of limestone which underlay the entire South East. Blue Lake is about 72 metres deep and some of the water in it is estimated to be about 500 years old but it is mixed with rain runoff each year as well. The Lake provides the water supply for Mt Gambier. Deep in the lake are examples of the oldest living organisms on earth- stromatalites. The lake changes colour from grey to vivid blue each November and reverts in the following April. The change in colour is related to the position of the sun and reflected light from suspended particles in the lake which reflect blue green light rather than brown grey light. Secondly the suspended matter only occurs because the water near the surface rises in temperature in the spring and it is this which causes the particles to precipitate out of the water. The precipitated matter settles on the bottom of the lake ready for a new cycle the following spring. Like the Blue Lake various sink holes in the district have linkages to the underlying aquifer through the layers of limestone too and they include Cave Gardens, Umpherstone, Piccaninni Ponds, etc.

Moorak Station and Tenison Woods College.
Moorak station as originally known as Mount Gambier Station established by George Glen in the 1840s. The leasehold was later taken over by David Power who in turn sold it to Fisher and Rochford who in turn sold the estate as freehold to the Scottish Dr William Browne who had established Booborowie run with his brother in 1843 north of Burra. The Browne brothers dissolved their partnership around 1865 and John went to live at Buckland Park and William took up residence at Moorak. William had purchased Moorak Station in 1862 and built the grand Moorak homestead in impressive Georgian style onto a smaller house there. William died in 1894 and the Moorak Estate passed to his son Colonel Percival Browne who was to disappear on the ill-fated voyage of the new steamer the Waratah in 1909 which disappeared during a storm off Durban, South Africa. Also on that voyage was Mrs. Agnes Hay (nee Gosse) of Mt Breckan Victor Harbor and Linden Park Estate Adelaide and some 200 other poor souls. Around 1909 the Moorak Station was subdivided for closer settlement and in the 1920s the Marist Brothers purchased the homestead with a little land for their and monastery and opened the Marist Brothers Agricultural College for boys in 1931. That college in turn merged with the Mater Christi College in 1972 to become Tenison College. (Mater Christi College had been formed in 1952 by the merger of the St Josephs Convent School (1880) and St Peters Parish School but the primary section of St Peters broke away in 1969 from Mater Christi College and formed a separate St Peters Primary School. This primary school in turn merged with Tenison College in 2001 to form Tenison Woods College!) The College name commemorates the work of Father Julian Tenison Woods who arrived in Mt Gambier in 1857 to work in Penola and Mt Gambier. It was he who encouraged Mary MacKillop to take her vows and establish her Sisters of St Joseph.

Dr Browne’s manager of Moorak Estate in 1868 introduced hops as a viable crop in the South East and large quantities were grown for about 20 years. Other early experimental crops grown included tobacco, cotton and flax. Dr Browne and Moorak were also important in the potato industry. Dr Browne leased around 830 acres to 20 tenants for the express purpose of growing potatoes. He was keen to emulate the British aristocracy although he was a good Scot with being a manorial style landlord with tenant farmers. Potatoes were also grown from the early years at Yahl, OB Flat and Compton near Mt Gambier. The potatoes were carted down to Port MacDonnell and shipped to Adelaide for consumers. As one of the major wool producers of Australia William Browne contributed roughly half of the funds for the erection of Christ Church Anglican in Mt Gambier. The Moorak estate consisted of around 11,000 acres of the most fertile volcanic soil in SA with another 2,000 acres in a nearby property, German Creek near Carpenter’s Rocks. Dr Browne ran Silky Lincolns on Moorak for their wool as Merinos did not fare well on the damp South East pastures. About 2,000 acres was in wheat, about 2,500 acres was tenanted to other farmers and around 4,000 acres were in lucerne, clover, rye and other pasture grasses. William Browne returned to live in England in 1866 so his sons could attend Eton and military training colleges there. He made regular trips to SA about every second year to oversee his many pastoral properties here. When he died in 1894 he left 100,000 acres of freehold land in SA to his children who all resided here as well as leasehold land. He was an extremely wealthy man. Son Percival took control of Moorak. Before Percival’s death Moorak Estate was partly purchased by the SA government in 1904 for closer settlement when they acquired around 1,000 acres. After Percival’s death a further 6,300 acres was acquired for closer settlement and the remainder of the estate was sold to other farmers. The government paid between £10 and £31 per acre for the land. Percival Browne was highly respected in Mt Gambier and a reserve around the Blue Lake is named after him. The fourth of the crater lakes of Mt Gambier is also named Browne’s Lake after the family but it has been dry for decades. In 1900 Colonel Browne planted the ring of English Oaks around what was to become the oval of the Marist Brothers College.

Moorak.
There is a memorial by the station to William Browne as founder of the Coriadale Sheep Stud. The great Moorak woolshed was demolished in 1939. The Union church which opened in 1920 was used by the Methodists and the Anglicans. It is now a private residence. Moorak hall was opened in 1926. New classrooms were added to the Moorak School in 1928 and the first rooms opened in 1913. The cheese factory in Moorak opened in 1913 as a cooperative and was sold to Farmers Union in 1949. They closed the factory in 1979. Most of the cheese produced at Moorak went to the Melbourne market. The first cheese maker at Moorak was trained at Lauterbach’s cheese factory at Woodside. Moorak was one of a circle of settlements around Mt Gambier that had butter/cheese factories. These towns were: Kongorong; Glencoe East; Glencoe West; Suttontown; Glenburnie; Mil Lel; Yahl; OB Flat; Moorak; Mt Schank; and Eight Mile Creek.

Yahl.
In the 1860s this tiny settlement was a tobacco, hop and potato growing district and it persisted with potatoes up until recent times. Today Yahl is little more than a suburban village of Mt Gambier with a Primary school with approx 120 students. The old government school was erected in 1879. It had a Methodist church built in 1880 which operated as a church until 1977 and it had a large butter factory which had opened in 1888. The butter and cheese factory was taken over by the OB Flat cheese factory in 1939 and the two operated in conjunction with each other. The OB Flat cheese factory closed in 1950 and all production moved to Yahl. The factory finally closed in 1971. The township of Yahl also had a General Store and a Salvation Army Hall which was built in 1919.

Sink Holes: Umpherston Gardens and Cave Gardens.
James Umpherston purchased land near Mt Gambier in 1864 which included a large sink hole or collapsed cavern with a lake in the bottom. He was born in Scotland in 1812 and came to SA in the 1850s with his brother William. William purchased his first land at Yahl in 1859. James Umpherston was a civic minded chap being a local councilor, a parliamentarian in Adelaide for two years and President of the Mt Gambier Agricultural and Horticultural Society for 13 years. When he retired from civic life and farming in 1884 he decided to create a garden in his sinkhole. He beautified it and encouraged visitors and even provided a boat in the lake for boat rides. Access was gained by steps and a path carved into the sinkhole walls. However after he died in 1900 the garden was ignored, became overgrown and was largely forgotten in 1949 when the Woods and Forests Department obtained the land for a new sawmill at Mt Gambier. By then the lake had dried up as the water table had fallen over the decades. In 1976 staff, rather than the government, decided to restore the Umpherstone gardens. The cleared out the rubbish that had been dumped in the sinkhole, restored the path access, trimmed the ivy and replanted the hydrangeas and tree ferns. In 1994 the Woos and Forests Department handed over the land around the sinkhole to the City of Mt Gambier. It was added to the SA Heritage Register in 1995.

Innovative Immigration and Border Control Reform

Innovative Immigration and Border Control Reform

A few nice equifax images I found:

Innovative Immigration and Border Control Reform
equifax
Image by CSIS: Center for Strategic & International Studies
Agenda
1:00-1:30PM: Registration
1:30-2:30PM: Keynote Discussion
The Honorable Jayson Ahern, former Acting Commissioner, U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Principal, The Chertoff Group
Michael Petrucelli, former Acting Director, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services and Executive Chairman and President, ClearPath, Inc.
The Honorable Julie Myers Wood, former Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security for Immigration and Customs Enforcement and President-Compliance, Federal Practice and Software Solutions, Guidepost Solutions, LLC
Moderated by: Susan Ginsburg, Member, DHS Quadrennial Review Advisory Committee and Nonresident Fellow, Migration Policy Institute
2:30-2:45PM: Break
2:45-3:45PM: Driving Technological Reform
Robert Mocny, Director, United States Visitor and Immigration Status Indicator Technology, U.S. Department of Homeland Security
The Honorable C. Stewart Verdery Jr., former Assistant Secretary for Border and Transportation Security Policy and PLanning, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and Founder and Partner, Monument Policy Group, LLC
Ryan Fox, Principal, Equifax
Moderated by: Norma Krayem, Senior Policy Advisor, Patton Boggs LLP and Senior Associate, CSIS Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Program
3:45-3:50PM: Break
3:50-4:50PM: Areas and Applications for Technological Innovation
Pamela Dingle, Senior Technical Architect, Ping Identity
Tamar Jacoby, President & CEO, Immigration Works
Sonia Padilla, Executive Director, Office of Technology and Acquisitions, U.S. Customs and Border Protection
Moderated by: Patrick R. Schambach, Vice President and General Manager, Homeland Security and Foreign Affairs, CSC
This event was made possible by the generous support of CSC and Ping Identity as well as additional support from Equifax.
csis.org/event/innovative-immigration-and-border-control-…

Innovative Immigration and Border Control Reform
equifax
Image by CSIS: Center for Strategic & International Studies
Agenda
1:00-1:30PM: Registration
1:30-2:30PM: Keynote Discussion
The Honorable Jayson Ahern, former Acting Commissioner, U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Principal, The Chertoff Group
Michael Petrucelli, former Acting Director, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services and Executive Chairman and President, ClearPath, Inc.
The Honorable Julie Myers Wood, former Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security for Immigration and Customs Enforcement and President-Compliance, Federal Practice and Software Solutions, Guidepost Solutions, LLC
Moderated by: Susan Ginsburg, Member, DHS Quadrennial Review Advisory Committee and Nonresident Fellow, Migration Policy Institute
2:30-2:45PM: Break
2:45-3:45PM: Driving Technological Reform
Robert Mocny, Director, United States Visitor and Immigration Status Indicator Technology, U.S. Department of Homeland Security
The Honorable C. Stewart Verdery Jr., former Assistant Secretary for Border and Transportation Security Policy and PLanning, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and Founder and Partner, Monument Policy Group, LLC
Ryan Fox, Principal, Equifax
Moderated by: Norma Krayem, Senior Policy Advisor, Patton Boggs LLP and Senior Associate, CSIS Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Program
3:45-3:50PM: Break
3:50-4:50PM: Areas and Applications for Technological Innovation
Pamela Dingle, Senior Technical Architect, Ping Identity
Tamar Jacoby, President & CEO, Immigration Works
Sonia Padilla, Executive Director, Office of Technology and Acquisitions, U.S. Customs and Border Protection
Moderated by: Patrick R. Schambach, Vice President and General Manager, Homeland Security and Foreign Affairs, CSC
This event was made possible by the generous support of CSC and Ping Identity as well as additional support from Equifax.
csis.org/event/innovative-immigration-and-border-control-…

Contesting credit score report errors

Contesting credit score report errors

Your credit score report. It’s not awfully amazing, but it might maintain you from taking pleasure in some of life’s most exciting turning points: Acquiring an auto. Possessing a residence. Even getting a new task.

So it is necessary to check in on your credit history from time to time. You need to know where you stand. As well as you additionally wish to keep an eye out for credit history report errors.

To find as well as contest mistakes on your credit scores report, you’ll initially need to get a copy of it.

You’ll see a great deal of websites and also ads boasting complimentary credit rating records and scores. The only one that’s absolutely complimentary, no strings affixed? AnnualCreditReport.com.

By regulation, you’re entitled to a totally free copy of your report from each of the 3 credit report bureaus annually. That’s TransUnion, Equifax as well as Experian.

Let’s claim you get a copy of your report, as well as whatever looks tidy. Well, after that you ready to go! But what if you find a mistake? Right here’s exactly what you should do.

Step two: Dispute mistakes. You’ll need to write a letter to the bureau informing them exactly what details is inaccurate. You can discover a sample letter on CreditCards.com.

Don’t make use of the on the internet form offered by the bureau– it limits how much evidence you could attach, and also could need you to authorize away some of your rights.

Below’s just what your communication must include: Duplicates of records that verify your claim. A clear recognition of the mistake. State the facts, briefly and simply, and request a removal or modification. You might also wish to consist of a copy of your credit score record.

Step 3: Keep records. As soon as your letter is written, keep a copy. If you’re mailing it, send it licensed and maintain the invoice.

As soon as your letter is received, the bureaus have to reinvestigate the things concerned, usually within 1 Month. They’ll likewise notify the party holding the mistake. That could be a bank or lender, for example.

If there is a mistake, all credit scores bureaus will certainly be notified, so your record could be updated. If your report’s been changed, you’ll get one more free duplicate of it.

As well as, if your report is updated, you can request the bureaus to send out adjustment notices to anybody that’s pulled your report in the previous six months. If your disagreement is refuted, you might include a 100-word declaration to your report, defining your side of the disagreement.

It deserves it to regularly check your credit report. If you do spot an error, you’ll want to tackle it as quickly as you can. Kristin Wong, CreditCards.com.
Video Rating:/ 5

Cool Consumer Credit images

Cool Consumer Credit images

Check out these consumer credit images:

Consumer Credit as of June 2011
consumer credit
Image by eric731
On August 5th, the Federal Reserve released its latest preliminary findings of revolving consumer credit, better known as credit card debt. Credit card debt was up for the month of June 2011 by a whopping 7.9 percent. That was the largest growth in credit card debt this year.

Unfortunately, non-revolving consumer credit went up as well by 7.6 percent in June. That means that the amount of auto loans, student loans, and boat loans went up steadily.

Therefore, overall consumer credit was up 7.7 percent in June which continues the 2011 trend of more consumer debt.

www.faithfulfinances.com/HouseholdDebt/HouseholdDebtClock…

Consumers Building
consumer credit
Image by UIC Digital Collections
Creator: Jenny, Mundie, & Jensen (Consumers Building)

Description: View of the upper part of the Consumers Building (220 South State Street), at the northeast corner of State Street and W. Quincy Street.
Photograph credit: Brubaker, C. William, 1987

Date: 1913 (Consumers Building)
Geographic coverage: Loop (Chicago, Ill.)

Collection: C. William Brubaker Collection (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Repository: University of Illinois at Chicago. Library. [Visual Resources].
Credit Line: Cite as [creator]. [title]. [file name]. [collection].
Rights: This image may be used freely, with attribution, for research, study and educational purposes. For permission to publish, distribute, or use this image for any other purpose, please contact Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago Library, 801 South Morgan St., Chicago, IL 60607. Phone: (312) 996-2742; email: lib-permissions@uic.edu.
File Name: bru005_06_jF

For more images from the collection, visit collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm4/index_uic_bru.php?CIS…

Data collection meeting
consumer credit
Image by CIFOR
Facilitators: Raphael Tsanga, Senior Research Officer, Edouard Essiane Mendoula, Research Assistant – Data collection meeting on the flow of wood to the consumer.

Photo by Ollivier Girard/CIFOR

cifor.org

blog.cifor.org

If you use one of our photos, please credit it accordingly and let us know. You can reach us through our Flickr account or at: cifor-mediainfo@cgiar.org and m.edliadi@cgiar.org

Cool Pay Back Charge Card photos

Cool Pay Back Charge Card photos

Check out these pay off bank card photos:

It’s No More Politically Proper Become A Christian In The Us
pay off charge card
Image by Big Gray Mare
My better half, Jake, are going to be 83 years of age in December, in which he can rememebr a time whenever our nation was one individuals who worked together for it’s good, plus the good of each other. Current events in Washington truly upset him, as he watches all he once knew and adored and thought in-being destroyed. He published these about 4 many years or so ago, as his sarcastic answer to the issues we had been facing after that, and then he asked me to post it "all throughout the internet", because he believes these solutions would apply today additionally. Anyhow…here’s Jake:

The “Cash 4 Clunkers” system appears to have been rather successful – at the very least as far as stimulating new vehicle product sales is concerned. However, a lot of the trade-ins were sound, quality, late-model pickups and SUV’s that dropped just below the fuel consumption restriction (because they certainly were big and hefty, and were geared consequently). Therefore the new cars that have been purchased included numerous hybrids that operate on batteries, hype, and hope. Will the purchasers actually pay for them? Additionally the so-called clunker trade-ins had been being totally destroyed–deliberately reduced to trash. Is it right? And many local automobile dealers have however to receive one red cent for the 00 assured for each of the piles of metallic junk. Actually, the entire Cash-4-Clunkers stimulation system ended up being terminated, before numerous dealers being compensated such a thing.

Obviously, hardly any money because of this, or other national program, must originate from an empty treasury. What exactly else is brand-new? If you were to sweep and vacuum all of the bare vaults at Fort Knox, you could produce sufficient gold-dust to make one tiny wedding band. But, why bother? Marriage rings tend to be outdated anyway. But promised repayment from federal government sponsored programs apparently work just fine. With this in mind—why perhaps not begin a tax reimbursement program? Handled properly, it may sponsor the maximum consumerism explosion within the reputation for the whole world.

It might work such as this: Every taxpayer in the U.S. would-be entitled to a ,000 reimbursement. Every person avove the age of 10 will be considered a taxpayer and therefore eligible. Since those under 10 try not to generally spend their own money—they would be excluded. We spend income tax, product sales tax, property income tax, gas tax, liquor taxation, tobacco taxation, poll tax, pole taxation, import tax, value-added tax, syntax, sin tax, excise taxation, deluxe taxation, and numerous various other taxes—too taxing to remember. Even unlawful immigrants spend taxes. Considering newest census information, there are 258,694,227 folks older than 10 in U.S. who would qualify for a ,000 reimbursement.

The taxation refund system would begin in October, however it usually takes some time to process the applications. However, since everyone is qualified and promised ,000 by our benevolent government—they begin investing instantly. People give tasks and vouchers to their expected checks. Credit cards growth. Property product sales go through the roof. Developers, technicians, and designers get crazy. Retail sales zoom. The economic growth is from the charts. Banks loan on maximum. However, there clearly was a downside.

The Tax Refund To People in america Program (or T-R-A-P)—as with every federal program—requires significant paperwork. Actually, the T-R-A-P application is 877 pages, and weighs in at 18 pounds 12 ounces. The U.S. Postal Service screams. Tree Huggers, Inc. goes crazy if they recognize the number of national woodlands expected to create that amount of paper—not even considering the lots of of lumber used in housing/construction growth. Al Gore involves Capitol Hill screaming that Nobel additionally created T.N.T. The T-R-A-P snaps shut. Not merely one dime is paid on American taxpayers—yet the economic climate is booming. The tax reimbursement program ends prior to xmas and our wonderful federal government gets control every bank in America in January. Hitler cannot have done it any better.

The two various other significant issues—health treatment and national debt—could be resolved just like quickly. Since our present nationwide government appears to be operating when you look at the Communist-Fascist-Socialist New World Order format – the reason why have they not seen such a facile option right available? It really is Social Protection. Correctly used, personal Security responses the majority of our health treatment and cash woes. It really is so easy, also young people understand most of the aspects. Indeed, many younger Americans can be knowledgeable.

Most younger Us americans know very well what Tweetie-Bird had for breakfast and where Goldi-locks itches. In addition they know that Michael Jackson’s circulatory system included 52percent medications and bleach and just 48per cent genuine blood. And every younger person understands that 40 is old, 50 is actually old, 60 is old, and 65 is ridiculous. & Most people in America – both old and young – realize that our existing personal security measures is considered the most huge Ponzi system ever. Younger folks won’t get a penny of whatever they contribute. So just why wait? You will want to cut-off all payouts from personal protection today? Money will come in, but absolutely nothing fades. Everybody over 65 is eliminated. All their possessions visit big government; and then we can then pay off the national debt, loan money to Asia and Brazil, and underwrite the Euro. SS Agents, definitely, will supervise. Social safety will become the answer rather than the issue.

The total assets of this senior in the usa is a mind-boggling quantity, surpassing the connected wealth of 158 poorer countries internationally. People in Congress (under 65, definitely) can divide-up condos, mansions, properties, etc.– but just one each. Because so many older individuals have resources stashed in off-shore banks, SS soldiers will soon be delivered to seize these reports — combined with the financial institutions and Caribbean Islands in which these are generally located. Everyone knows why these countries should are part of America anyhow.

Numerous tasks are created. Hawaiian document forgers are overrun with sales for delivery certificates showing more recent beginning dates. And, needless to say, numerous jobs become available to develop and operate the Senior Serenity System — something which gets rid of a senior’s aches, discomforts, concerns, and confusion forever. Each facility is made of a rather big caldron, capable of keeping 1000 seniors, a forge furnace, and a conveyer through a tunnel. SS representatives with pitchforks maintain the conveyer operating smoothly. Plentiful corn oil, unused for ethanol, can be used the boiling-in-oil procedure. Regarding 2nd day, the heat achieves 2,200 degrees — then it’s allowed to cool. On the 4th time, funeral parlor employees arrive at skim off burial containers, before any tastes tend to be added. Cinnamon, lemon-lime, and chili all seem to work; however the original “Granny” flavor is by far the most popular – whether for Fido and Rover in “Bow-Wow Chow” or George and Larry in “Wham-Bam Spam”. The menu of brand new tasks and other good implications continues as well as on.

Alaska Caldron # 3 could possibly be built at the conclusion of the Bridge to Nowhere. Video of SS representatives with pitchforks, keeping purchase on a conveyer, can be purchased to evangelists, and therefore are shown on large displays at revivals. Since griping, grouching, frowning, and bitching are not any longer permitted – SS agents enforce our delight. Yippee!

Whilst the elderly vanish, the typical health of this populace improves significantly. Actually, Alzheimer’s hardly ever appears after all, and Erectile Dysfunction becomes relatively uncommon. Assisted living facilities can now take-in the homeless. There is absolutely no even more Medicare or Medicaid. Hospitals today compete, making use of reduced prices. Doctors will need to work for reasonable wages. For example, a normal MD will get twice the minimum-wage. Surgeons get 3 times minimum wage, therefore the Surgeon General gets a whopping 4 times the minimum wage. How can it be anymore fair. Also, it really is discovered that swine flu is a by-product of excessive congressional pork distribute all over the united states – which will be corrected just like shortly as pigs fly. Thank you for visiting this new America!

Jake Von Canon

Please feel free to send to everyone you realize, ever knew, or never understood.

Piano on pier, Jun 2011 – 52
pay off charge card
Image by Ed Yourdon
Another few, another puppy. In history is the nj-new jersey shoreline…

Note: this picture had been published in a Feb 6, 2012 blog site entitled "25 Great Date some ideas for you personally plus Man." Also it was posted in a Jul 2, 2012 blog site entitled "Education, wealth while the place your home is can impact your weight."

Moving into 2013, the photo was published in an Aug 31, 2013 Austin musical Photos weblog with the exact same name and detailed records that I experienced written on this Flickr page.

Moving into 2014, the photo had been published in a Sep 30, 2014 weblog entitled "The 15 Most Readily Useful Cities For Partners." It absolutely was additionally published in a Dec 31, 2014 blog titled "Paying Off Your Spouse’s Financial Obligation Is Nearly Constantly A Poor Idea."

**************************

Many years ago, British artist Luke Jerram created the intriguing notion of dispersing pianos across the town, with an open invite for anyone nearby to walk up and begin playing some thing. Everything. He started in London, and afterwards introduced his festival (known as "Play me personally, I’m Yours") for some 19 metropolitan areas worldwide — including Moscow, Sydney, São Paulo, Barcelona, Bristol, Bath, Birmingham, Cincinnati, San Jose, and Pécs — before coming to nyc in June 2010. Sixty pianos were donated, painted, and "installed" for the five boroughs of New York; and during a period of a couple of weeks, I managed to check out every single one of them (with the exception of two pianos in Queens, which have been vandalized and eliminated before i really could arrive at all of them) and photographed all of them in our Flickr set.

I experienced these types of a great time using the nyc pianos that I examined Luke’s website sporadically to see just what plans he’d for 2011. Along with programs for Geneva, Adelaide, also locations, he scheduled a festival in Austin, TX the thirty days of April, information on which you can see at this website. There have been just 14 pianos in Austin, numerous found over the lake that works through the center associated with town. As with New York, approximately 2/3 of these had been sitting empty and alone when I reached all of them — so there had been only five pianos in which i really could actually hear folks playing music. Per of those five, we made movie recordings; there is all of them on our Internet site.

I wondered whether Luke would be bringing his piano festival back into nyc again in 2011, but another type of group made a decision to jump in first, with a somewhat much more ambitious task: in place of 60 pianos, they placed 88 pianos around the town. The project is called "Sing for Hope"; it acknowledges it was impressed by Luke Jerram, also it promises become the "world’s biggest street piano set up up to now, and it is expected to achieve over two million folks."

The task’s web web site has actually a map showing where all 88 pianos have-been placed, and I decided immediately that it was far more than i really could desire to tackle. Sixty pianos this past year was hard enough; which 12 months, there are twelve just in Staten Island alone, and of course the dozens of various other ones scattered throughout New york, Queens, Brooklyn, and Bronx. Sheesh! So, at least for the time being, i have limited my visits to one piano — the one that’s positioned relatively near to where we stay, and another that i recall from just last year’s event to be very picturesque, situated at the end of a pier that runs out to the Hudson River, at 70th Street regarding Upper West Side of Manhattan.

Clearly, the pier was not built as a showcase when it comes to "Sing for Hope" piano; it absolutely was in fact built by Donald Trump’s real-estate kingdom back 2000, on top of a classic wooden pier which was built a hundred years ago when freighters and barges unloaded their cargo all across the west side of Manhattan. Whenever shipping faded when you look at the 1950s and a few major railroads collapsed into personal bankruptcy, the pier fell into disuse and decay; it was further damaged by an enormous fire in 1971. I recall running right out to the end of the pier into the mid-70s once I existed on Riverside Drive, wondering each and every time whether I became planning operate onto a rotting plank and descend to the river below, not to be heard from once again… But all of that was a long time ago, yet again the new pier is here now for everybody to take pleasure from, nobody recalls the annals.

Therefore … this Flickr set contains some pictures of piano in its devoted place, including a couple of brief movies of numerous New Yorkers playing whatever songs appeals to them. There have been all brand new Yorkers, and perhaps various visitors and tourists, who had no interest in the piano, but which just desired to enjoy the weather and the terrific view down and up the lake; I photographed a lot of them also. In the river, there have been barges and tugboats, kayaks and jet-skis, sailboats and yachts … and two quite amazing ships I’ve previously seen, flying an American banner with a huge "Gay Pride" flag that looked big enough to wrap around the complete ship.

Altogether, it absolutely was a great way to spend a couple of hours on a warm Sunday mid-day. And these pictures are going to be uploaded over a three-day vacation week-end when there will be an even much better excuse to hustle down seriously to the pier to pay a couple of hours: the annual Fourth of July fireworks show. If you’re down truth be told there, look around for a crazy man with a camera: it might be me.

Q2 2008 Bank Card Offers
pay off bank card
Image by jcarter
These are all of our bank card offers from April through June 2008. The very first quarter letters tend to be right here:

flickr.com/photos/jcarter/2398075003/

It looks like my attempts to opt-out associated with the provides tend to be paying off; we only got 13 letters this quarter, down from 30 last one-fourth.